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I am working on an exercise on C++ which demands to simulate a service queue and it asks to do it with a round,one dimension array.So it demands, when a customer comes to insert in the queue his name, the number of his card and the arrival time in the queue.

So my first question is how can I enter all these elements in one position of the array?(I don't know if it is called cell of array or position,English is not my native) Each customer will have to occupy only one position of the array and I have to insert all of his info in one position. I already know the conditions on how to insert or extract an element from a round queue I just don't know how to do it for lots of them.

Secondly it asks to print how much time the customer has to wait in queue depending on how much people are waiting before him (it doesn't have to be too precise though).

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i think you mean a circular buffer - as a queue is that right? –  Caribou Nov 1 '12 at 18:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For the first question: Could you create a class or struct representing the collection of data, and put the entire struct into your container?

(Edit: Customer is now a class, has a constructor; added example of instantiation) You'll want to clean this up a little, but something like:

class Customer {
private:
  std::string m_name;
  int m_card_number;
  int m_arrival_time;
public:
  Customer() : m_card_number(0), m_arrival_time(0) { } // might need default ctor

  Customer(const std::string name, int card_number, int_arrival time)
  : m_name(name), m_card_number(card_number), m_arrival_time(arrival_time)
  { }
};

std::dequeue<Customer> service_queue; // or your container here

Customer c = Customer(name, card_num, current_time);
service_queue.push_back(c);

For the second question; if you don't need to persist the time, and only need to work with differences, one solution is to use clock. Just don't forget to divide by CLOCKS_PER_SECOND once you take your time difference (in ticks) and need to convert to seconds.

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I get what you are saying but can you give an example on how to put a class into one cell of the array, because I am not really used to structs and I think that if I try to use a struct right now I might mess things up. As for the second one I don't think the clock will do because what clock do is measure how much time a part of code take to run, what I want to do is print how much time the customer will have to wait in order to get served. –  MKB Nov 1 '12 at 19:39
    
No problem; I've added the edit. Is this what you're after? On a side note, there isn't much difference between a class and a struct if they're 'plain-old-data'; structs have public fields by default, classes have private. Other differences only come into play once you start adding functions or subclassing. –  WeirdlyCheezy Nov 1 '12 at 19:53
    
Thanks for your help. I think I got this. –  MKB Nov 1 '12 at 21:28
    
@MKB No problem. If this answer was helpful, could you please upvote and/or accept it? –  WeirdlyCheezy Nov 1 '12 at 21:38
    
Also, regarding the clock; the way you would use it is to take differences between two tick counts to get a 'time difference' between those two points in time. For example, you could calculate how much time elapsed in between two customers arriving. However, this still might not be helpful. If you could give more details on how you want to estimate the time a customer will have to wait, I can try to give a more concrete answer. –  WeirdlyCheezy Nov 1 '12 at 21:46

I would push structs into your queue, each struct will hold the necessary elements needed.

struct Customer
{
    string name;
    int ID;
    double change;
}

//in add function...
Customer newCustomer
cin >> newCustomer.name >> newCustomer.ID >> newCustomer.change;
queue.push_back(newCustomer);


retreiving data is simply asking for each element
//in a loop printing out the queue
std::cout << iter->name << iter->ID << iter->change
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