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I am encountering an example where the strategy pattern in a domain model should be used. I have a User class representing users of the system. Each user may receive requests while using the system. Upon reception of a request, some processing logics are possible:

  • Automatically remove the requests
  • Notify the user about the received request
  • etc...

In this case, it seems that the strategy pattern is adapted. I have an interface called RequestReceivedPolicy with multiple classes that implement this interface (i.e. one class per processing logic). The User class holds a reference on one instance of the class corresponding to the selected policy.

This seems right on the object side. My question concerns the persistence side which, in my case, is a relational database. A user selects a policy through the a management interface. I want to persist this choice so that next time the user login, this information is saved. I thought about persisting the instance hold by the User class but I don't think it's the right way, since this instance is more about logic than data.

Thanks


EDIT:

public RequestReceivedPolicy {
    public boolean processRequest(); 
}

public IgnoreRequestPolicy implements RequestReceivedPolicy {
    public boolean processRequest(){
       //ignore logic
    } 
}

public CustomRequestPolicy {
    private int someData1;
    private String someData2;

    public boolean processRequest(){
       //custom logic that uses someData1 and someData2
    } 
}
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It depends. Do you need the details of the RequestReceivedPolicy instance or just the knowledge of the type of request received policy associated with the user? –  neontapir Nov 1 '12 at 19:15
    
@neontapir Since each policy type has associated information required for the processing, I think I need both this information and the type of policy. –  Mickael Marrache Nov 1 '12 at 19:17
    
Establish a standard for representing logic models using data, much like a rules engine would. I think there is a term for that concept but I can't think of a name. Basically, you want your controller to consume model instructions in the form of data, and then however you persist it is up to you. If I understand your question correctly. –  amphibient Nov 1 '12 at 19:20
    
@foampile Sorry, but I don't understand your comment. Could you give me some examples or resources? –  Mickael Marrache Nov 1 '12 at 19:23
    
what i mean by "standard for representing logical models using data" is, instead of the business logic being programmed in the application tier, establish a convention for defining that logic by data, sort of like your own 4GL by which you would be passing instruction to your controller that does different things based on what those instructions tell it to do. also, check this out: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convention_over_configuration –  amphibient Nov 1 '12 at 19:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The location of the policy choice persistance depends on where/how that policy gets passed in or configured into your User class, and you didn't really ellaborate that.

If, for example, your User class has something like this:

class User
{
   // policy is passed in during ctor
   public User(object otherArgs, RequestReceivedPolicy policy)
   {
   }
}

...then the class responsible for creating the User would likely have to maintain that preference external to User.

Similarly, if the User object simple holds the RequestReceivedPolicy reference like this:

class User
{
   public User(object otherArgs)
   {
   }

   public void setPolicy(RequestReceivedPolicy policy)
   {
      _currPolicy = policy;       
   }

   public RequestReceivedPolicy getPolicy()
   {
      return _currPolicy;       
   }

}

...and the User class has no way to set its own Policy object then, again, you have to rely on an external entity to persist the policy choice.

If instead the policy selection is "pulled" into the User class like this:

class User
{
   public User(object otherArgs, RequestReceivedPolicyProvider policyProvider)
   {
   }

   public void someStimulii(object criteria, ...)
   {
      _currPolicy = _policyProvider.getPolicy(criteria);
   }

}

...or this...

class User
{
   public User(object otherArgs)
   {
   }

   public void someStimulii(object criteria, ...)
   {
      _currPolicy = PolicyProvider.getInstance().getPolicy(criteria);
   }

}

...then the User object should persist its selection so that it can pull that policy object when it is recreated/constructed again later. In this case, it is the "criteria" that would need to be persisted, and it might be helpful if the RequestReceivedPolicy had an additional method to return that criteria:

RequestReceivedPolicyConfig policyConfig =  _currPolicy.getConfiguration();  

The RequestReceivedPolicyConfig object should be opaque to the User object, but internally perhaps be simple dictionary that supports persistance. Then the User can pass it to the persistence layer without knowing much about it. When pulling it from the persistence layer, it is used to reinstall the RequestReceivedPolicy using the provider. At a minumum, each RequestReceivedPolicyConfig object would contain the class identity of the RequestReceivedPolicy.

It is possible to have a hybrid, where the Policy is pushed via set/get but the User object can also pull in a new policy via something like the above PolicyProvider.getInstance().getPolicy(criteria) then you still allow the User object to take advantage of the RequestReceivedPolicyConfig based approach or keep persistence external.

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