Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why is the Borg pattern better than the Singleton pattern?

I ask because I don't see them resulting in anything different.

Borg:

class Borg:
  __shared_state = {}
  # init internal state variables here
  __register = {}
  def __init__(self):
    self.__dict__ = self.__shared_state
    if not self.__register:
      self._init_default_register()

Singleton:

class Singleton:
  def __init__(self):
    # init internal state variables here
    self.__register = {}
    self._init_default_register()

# singleton mechanics external to class, for example this in the module
Singleton = Singleton()

What I want to display here is that the service object, whether implemented as Borg or Singleton, has a nontrivial internal state (it provides some service based on it) (I mean it has to be something useful it's not a Singleton/Borg just for fun).

And this state has to be inited. Here the Singleton implementation is more straightforward, since we treat init as the set-up of the global state. I find it awkward that the Borg object has to query its internal state to see if it should update itself.

It becomes worse the more internal state you have. For example, if the object has to listen to the Application's teardown signal to save its register to disk, that registration should only be done once as well, and this is easier with a Singleton.

share|improve this question
1  
Borg pattern? ^_^ I'd first heard of it as c2.com/cgi/wiki?MonostatePattern –  Jeffrey Hantin Mar 11 '10 at 22:40
7  
Monostate? We are the Martellis. We say Borg. –  u0b34a0f6ae Mar 13 '10 at 15:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 25 down vote accepted

The real reason that borg is different comes down to subclassing.

If you subclass a borg, the subclass' objects have the same state as their parents classes objects, unless you explicitly override the shared state in that subclass. Each subclass of the singleton pattern has its own state and therefore will produce different objects.

Also in the singleton pattern the objects are actually the same, not just the state (even though the state is the only thing that really matters).

share|improve this answer
1  
> Also in the singleton pattern the objects are actually the same, not just the state (even though the state is the only thing that really matters). Why is that a bad thing? –  agiliq Aug 23 '09 at 15:20
    
good question uswaretech, it is a part of my question above. What is that said as bad? –  u0b34a0f6ae Aug 23 '09 at 15:33
    
thank you for the video link –  u0b34a0f6ae Aug 23 '09 at 15:34
2  
I did not say it was a bad thing. It was an opinion-less observation on the differences. Sorry for the confusion. Sometimes the singleton will be better infact, if for example you do any checks on the objects id by id(obj), even though this is rare. –  David Raznick Aug 23 '09 at 16:04

It is not. What is generally not recommended is a pattern like this in python:

class Singleton(object):

 _instance = None

 def __init__(self, ...):
  ...

 @classmethod
 def instance(cls):
  if cls._instance is None:
   cls._instance = cls(...)
  return cls._instance

where you use a class method to get the instance instead of the constructor. Python's metaprogramming allows much better methods, e.g. the one one wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singleton_pattern#Python.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 The Monostate (Borg) pattern is worse than Singleton (yes, it's possible) because private a = new Borg(); private b = new Borg(); b.mutate(); and a is changed! How confusing is that? –  Michael Deardeuff Nov 5 '11 at 23:47
3  
Best/ worse? That would depend on your usecase wouldn't it. I can think of a number of cases where you would want state preserved like that. –  RickyA Nov 16 '12 at 12:08
1  
This is not a problem, @MichaelDeardeuff. This is intended behaviour. They Should be the same. A problem IMHO in the borg pattern is, that if you add some initialisation variables in the Borg.__init__ method, like self.text = "", then change that object like borg1.text = "blah" and then instantiate a new object `borg2 = Borg()" - wham! all borg1 attributes that are initialized in init are whiped. so instantiating is impossible - or better: In the Borg pattern, you MAY NOT initialize member attributes in the init method! –  NerDoc Nov 28 '13 at 14:49
    
This is possible in a Singleton because there is an if check wether there is already an instance, and if yes, it is just returned WITHOUT an overriding initialisation! –  NerDoc Nov 28 '13 at 14:51

A class basically describes how you can access (read/write) the internal state of your object.

In the singleton pattern you can only have a single class, i.e. all your objects will give you the same access points to the shared state. This means that if you have to provide an extended API, you will need to write a wrapper, wrapping around the singleton

In the borg pattern you are able to extend the base "borg" class, and thereby more conveniently extend the API for your taste.

share|improve this answer

It's only better in those few cases where you actually have a difference. Like when you subclass. The Borg pattern is extremely unusual, I've never needed it for real in ten years of Python programming.

share|improve this answer

In python if you want a unique "object" that you can access from anywhere just create a class Unique that only contains static attributes, @staticmethods, and @classmethods; you could call it the Unique Pattern. Here I implement and compare the 3 patterns:

Unique

#Unique Pattern
class Unique:
#Define some static variables here
    x = 1
    @classmethod
    def init(cls):
        #Define any computation performed when assigning to a "new" object
        return cls

Singleton

#Singleton Pattern
class Singleton:

    __single = None 

    def __init__(self):
        if not Singleton.__single:
            #Your definitions here
            self.x = 1 
        else:
            raise RuntimeError('A Singleton already exists') 

    @classmethod
    def getInstance(cls):
        if not cls.__single:
            cls.__single = Singleton()
        return cls.__single

Borg

#Borg Pattern
class Borg:

    __monostate = None

    def __init__(self):
        if not Borg.__monostate:
            Borg.__monostate = self.__dict__
            #Your definitions here
            self.x = 1

        else:
            self.__dict__ = Borg.__monostate

Test

#SINGLETON
print "\nSINGLETON\n"
A = Singleton.getInstance()
B = Singleton.getInstance()

print "At first B.x = {} and A.x = {}".format(B.x,A.x)
A.x = 2
print "After A.x = 2"
print "Now both B.x = {} and A.x = {}\n".format(B.x,A.x)
print  "Are A and B the same object? Answer: {}".format(id(A)==id(B))


#BORG
print "\nBORG\n"
A = Borg()
B = Borg()

print "At first B.x = {} and A.x = {}".format(B.x,A.x)
A.x = 2
print "After A.x = 2"
print "Now both B.x = {} and A.x = {}\n".format(B.x,A.x)
print  "Are A and B the same object? Answer: {}".format(id(A)==id(B))


#UNIQUE
print "\nUNIQUE\n"
A = Unique.init()
B = Unique.init()

print "At first B.x = {} and A.x = {}".format(B.x,A.x)
A.x = 2
print "After A.x = 2"
print "Now both B.x = {} and A.x = {}\n".format(B.x,A.x)
print  "Are A and B the same object? Answer: {}".format(id(A)==id(B))

Output:

SINGLETON

At first B.x = 1 and A.x = 1
After A.x = 2
Now both B.x = 2 and A.x = 2

Are A and B the same object? Answer: True

BORG

At first B.x = 1 and A.x = 1
After A.x = 2
Now both B.x = 2 and A.x = 2

Are A and B the same object? Answer: False

UNIQUE

At first B.x = 1 and A.x = 1
After A.x = 2
Now both B.x = 2 and A.x = 2

Are A and B the same object? Answer: True

In my opinion, Unique implementation is the easiest, then Borg and finally Singleton with an ugly number of two functions needed for its definition.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.