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Given:

private Calendar calendarInstance = Calendar.getInstance();

public long inMillis() {
    calendarInstance.set(year, month, day, hour, min);
    return calendarInstance.getTimeInMillis();
}

As i understand it, the result comes back with time since the epoch, in milliseconds

The current time as UTC milliseconds from the epoch.

Given that my test always sets the objects the same, why are results coming up different as time goes by?

detailedMoment = new MomentInTime(2012, 11, 1, 19, 9);
detailedMoment.inMillis() // gives different results as time passes by

UPDATE:

I continue to second guess myself due to enter image description here

For the same time period i get

1_351_796_940 // http://www.epochconverter.com
1_354_410_540 // my number
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you should use clear(). If you do that it will return you the exact number of miliseconds each time.

public long inMillis() {
    calendarInstance.clear();
    calendarInstance.set(year, month, day, hour, min);
    return calendarInstance.getTimeInMillis();
}

From Java doc

Sets all the calendar field values and the time value (millisecond offset from the Epoch) of this Calendar undefined. This means that isSet() will return false for all the calendar fields, and the date and time calculations will treat the fields as if they had never been set. A Calendar implementation class may use its specific default field values for date/time calculations. For example, GregorianCalendar uses 1970 if the YEAR field value is undefined.

A Sample program

public class MomentInTime {

private static Calendar calendarInstance = Calendar.getInstance();

public static long inMillis() {
    calendarInstance.clear();
    calendarInstance.set(2012, 10, 1, 19, 9);
    return calendarInstance.getTimeInMillis();
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        System.out.println(inMillis()/1000);
        Thread.sleep(300);
    }
}
}

Output:

 1351777140

enter image description here

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@Jam I checked it and I get consistent results with It.I even converted to Date and checked it returns appropriate value. –  AmitD Nov 1 '12 at 20:11
    
My numbers seem to disagree with epochconverter.com. What do you get when getting time in milliseconds on date above –  Jam Nov 1 '12 at 20:13
    
@Jam Added a Sample you can check the out put it is same for that day though there is sleep and time is changing. –  AmitD Nov 1 '12 at 20:17
    
Thank you. You're absolutely right. Can you please glance above and help explain possible number discrepancy. –  Jam Nov 1 '12 at 20:17
    
@Jam Problem might be because you are not specifying time zone and converting to GMT. Check with Local time zone. My values match exactly. You have to create calendar instance using Timezone GMT to match with GMT –  AmitD Nov 1 '12 at 20:29
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Well you don't set the seconds or milliseconds. JavaDoc says:

Sets the year, month, day of the month, hour of day and minute fields. Other fields are not changed.

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I guess that is because you are missing seconds and milliseconds of the Calendar.getInstance().

You are just replacing year, month, day, hour, min of Calendar object, but every time when you get calendar instance, seconds and milliseconds of that particular point in time may change.

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