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i thought i'm a Ruby giant when i wrote this oneliner:

# having this hash
hash = { 'Portugal' => 1, 'France' => 2, 'USA' => 3 }

# country_id comes from input
country_name = (hash.select { |k,v| v == country_id.to_i }.first || []).first

it does correctly extract the country name and does Not fail if country not found.

i'm totally pleased with it.

however my tutor says it can/should be optimized in terms of readability, length and performance!

what can be clearer/faster than this?

please advise

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Are you certain that the values in your Hash are unique? –  mu is too short Nov 1 '12 at 20:28
    
yes, that's a condition of the test, just forgot to mention –  San Tiago Nov 1 '12 at 20:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

well, seems your tutor is right :)

you can do like this:

hash.invert[ country_id.to_i ] # will work on all versions

or, as suggested by @littlecegian

hash.key( country_id.to_i )    # will work on 1.9 only

or, as suggested by @steenslag

hash.index( country_id.to_i )  # will work on 1.8 and 1.9, with a warning on 1.9

Full example:

hash = { 'Portugal' => 1, 'France' => 2, 'USA' => 3 }

%w[2 3 1 blah].each do |country_id|

  # all versions
  country_name = hash.invert[ country_id.to_i ]

  # 1.9 only
  country_name = hash.key( country_id.to_i )

  # 1.8 and 1.9, with a warning on 1.9
  country_name = hash.index( country_id.to_i )


  printf "country_id = %s, country_name = %s\n", country_id, country_name
end

will print:

country_id = 2, country_name = France
country_id = 3, country_name = USA
country_id = 1, country_name = Portugal
country_id = blah, country_name =

see it running here

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer, thank you. Also, neat "rbFiddle" service :) –  San Tiago Nov 1 '12 at 20:40
2  
Inverting a whole hash just to retrieve one key? Hmm. –  steenslag Nov 1 '12 at 22:11
    
just to make sure it run on all versions. i noted in my answer there are key for 1.9 and index for 1.8 –  user904990 Nov 1 '12 at 22:14
    
Indeed,you edited your answer to include both @littlecegian and my answer, without mentioning so. Bad etiquette IMHO. The silly named index-method will work on both Ruby versions, but it will yield a warning on 1.9. –  steenslag Nov 1 '12 at 22:27
    
you right, bad etiquette, sorry, updating –  user904990 Nov 1 '12 at 22:30

If it is ruby 1.9.3, you can use hash.key(country_id.to_i)

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good to know, thank you, though it is intended for 1.8 –  San Tiago Nov 1 '12 at 20:35
hash = { 'Portugal' => 1, 'France' => 2, 'USA' => 3 }
puts hash.invert[3] # "USA"
share|improve this answer
hash = { 'Portugal' => 1, 'France' => 2, 'USA' => 3 }
hash.index(2) # => "France"

is the Ruby 1.8.x way. The index method is deprecated in 1.9 and being replaced with the key method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, it makes a lot of sense. I would accept it but i prefer answers "for dumies", with long examples and live demos :) –  San Tiago Nov 1 '12 at 23:06

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