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I need to split strings of data using each character from string.punctuation and string.whitespace as a separator.

Furthermore, I need for the separators to remain in the output list, in between the items they separated in the string.

For example,

"Now is the winter of our discontent"

should output:

['Now', ' ', 'is', ' ', 'the', ' ', 'winter', ' ', 'of', ' ', 'our', ' ', 'discontent']

I'm not sure how to do this without resorting to an orgy of nested loops, which is unacceptably slow. How can I do it?

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I'm guessing since you accepted DSM's answer you intended for consecutive punctuation characters to stay grouped together? –  John Nov 1 '12 at 23:23
    
@johnthexiii, I accepted it because it didn't use re. The option to group consecutive separators is an added bonus, although I'm sure it can be done easily with regex as well. –  blz Nov 1 '12 at 23:26

9 Answers 9

up vote 19 down vote accepted

A different non-regex approach from the others:

>>> import string
>>> from itertools import groupby
>>> 
>>> special = set(string.punctuation + string.whitespace)
>>> s = "One two  three    tab\ttabandspace\t end"
>>> 
>>> split_combined = [''.join(g) for k, g in groupby(s, lambda c: c in special)]
>>> split_combined
['One', ' ', 'two', '  ', 'three', '    ', 'tab', '\t', 'tabandspace', '\t ', 'end']
>>> split_separated = [''.join(g) for k, g in groupby(s, lambda c: c if c in special else False)]
>>> split_separated
['One', ' ', 'two', '  ', 'three', '    ', 'tab', '\t', 'tabandspace', '\t', ' ', 'end']

Could use dict.fromkeys and .get instead of the lambda, I guess.

[edit]

Some explanation:

groupby accepts two arguments, an iterable and an (optional) keyfunction. It loops through the iterable and groups them with the value of the keyfunction:

>>> groupby("sentence", lambda c: c in 'nt')
<itertools.groupby object at 0x9805af4>
>>> [(k, list(g)) for k,g in groupby("sentence", lambda c: c in 'nt')]
[(False, ['s', 'e']), (True, ['n', 't']), (False, ['e']), (True, ['n']), (False, ['c', 'e'])]

where terms with contiguous values of the keyfunction are grouped together. (This is a common source of bugs, actually -- people forget that they have to sort by the keyfunc first if they want to group terms which might not be sequential.)

As @JonClements guessed, what I had in mind was

>>> special = dict.fromkeys(string.punctuation + string.whitespace, True)
>>> s = "One two  three    tab\ttabandspace\t end"
>>> [''.join(g) for k,g in groupby(s, special.get)]
['One', ' ', 'two', '  ', 'three', '    ', 'tab', '\t', 'tabandspace', '\t ', 'end']

for the case where we were combining the separators. .get returns None if the value isn't in the dict.

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3  
Or another option instead of lambda (albeit it ugly) groupby(s, special.__contains__) ... –  Jon Clements Nov 1 '12 at 22:14
    
@JonClements: yeah, I think I'd use a dict before I'd use a special method. :^) –  DSM Nov 1 '12 at 22:15
1  
partial(contains, special) then ? ;) –  Jon Clements Nov 1 '12 at 22:17
    
@DSM, What would be the advantage of using a dict instead of the lambda? –  blz Nov 1 '12 at 22:18
1  
special = dict.fromkeys(string.punctuation + string.whitespace, True); split_combined = [''.join(g) for k, g in groupby(s, special.get)] is what I think DSM means... @blz [wrt .fromkeys anyway] –  Jon Clements Nov 1 '12 at 22:25
import re
import string

p = re.compile("[^{0}]+|[{0}]+".format(re.escape(
    string.punctuation + string.whitespace)))

print p.findall("Now is the winter of our discontent")

I'm no big fan of using regexps for all problems, but I don't think you have much choice in this if you want it fast and short.

I'll explain the regexp since you're not familiar with it:

  • [...] means any of the characters inside the square brackets
  • [^...] means any of the characters not inside the square brackets
  • + behind means one or more of the previous thing
  • x|y means to match either x or y

So the regexp matches 1 or more characters where either all must be punctuation and whitespace, or none must be. The findall method finds all non-overlapping matches of the pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
You probably want to use re.escape(string.punctuation + string.whitespace), otherwise I think your character classes will end early on ]. –  Andrew Clark Nov 1 '12 at 21:59
    
I don't think it works for "..Now is the winter of our discontent" –  John Nov 1 '12 at 22:01
    
@F.J Fixed. And "..Now is the winter of our discontent" works for me. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Nov 1 '12 at 22:03
    
@lazyr shouldn't '..' be '.', '.' –  John Nov 1 '12 at 22:05
2  
@blz As I said, I'm no big fan of regexp solutions. DSM's answer was impressive, and I suspect it's the best you could hope for in terms of speed, outside of regexps (this solution is 4.5 times faster than his, if you don't count the compiling of the regexp. Including compile, it's about equally fast.) –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Nov 2 '12 at 8:34

Try this:

import re
re.split('(['+re.escape(string.punctuation + string.whitespace)+']+)',"Now is the winter of our discontent")

Explanation from the Python documentation:

If capturing parentheses are used in pattern, then the text of all groups in the pattern are also returned as part of the resulting list.

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1  
Ugly behavior with consecutive spaces: re.split(r'( )', ' '*2) results in ['', ' ', '', ' ', '']. –  Andrew Clark Nov 1 '12 at 22:11
    
@F.J consecutive spaces/separators should be handled better now. –  Bula Nov 1 '12 at 22:32

Solution in linear (O(n)) time:

Let's say you have a string:

original = "a, b...c    d"

First convert all separators to space:

splitters = string.punctuation + string.whitespace
trans = string.maketrans(splitters, ' ' * len(splitters))
s = original.translate(trans)

Now s == 'a b c d'. Now you can use itertools.groupby to alternate between spaces and non-spaces:

result = []
position = 0
for _, letters in itertools.groupby(s, lambda c: c == ' '):
    letter_count = len(list(letters))
    result.append(original[position:position + letter_count])
    position += letter_count

Now result == ['a', ', ', 'b', '...', 'c', ' ', 'd'], which is what you need.

share|improve this answer

My take:

from string import whitespace, punctuation
import re

pattern = re.escape(whitespace + punctuation)
print re.split('([' + pattern + '])', 'now is the winter of')
share|improve this answer
    
+1 wrote exactly the same thing a minute later ;) –  DzinX Nov 1 '12 at 22:09
3  
Ugly behavior with consecutive delimiters: re.split('([' + pattern + '])', '..') results in ['', '.', '', '.', '']. –  Andrew Clark Nov 1 '12 at 22:13

Depending on the text you are dealing with, you may be able to simplify your concept of delimiters to "anything other than letters and numbers". If this will work, you can use the following regex solution:

re.findall(r'[a-zA-Z\d]+|[^a-zA-Z\d]', text)

This assumes that you want to split on each individual delimiter character even if they occur consecutively, so 'foo..bar' would become ['foo', '.', '.', 'bar']. If instead you expect ['foo', '..', 'bar'], use [a-zA-Z\d]+|[^a-zA-Z\d]+ (only difference is adding + at the very end).

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This won't work for characters outside of ASCII range. –  DzinX Nov 1 '12 at 22:20
from string import punctuation, whitespace

s = "..test. and stuff"

f = lambda s, c: s + ' ' + c + ' ' if c in punctuation else s + c
l =  sum([reduce(f, word).split() for word in s.split()], [])

print l
share|improve this answer

For any arbitrary collection of separators:

def separate(myStr, seps):
    answer = []
    temp = []
    for char in myStr:
        if char in seps:
            answer.append(''.join(temp))
            answer.append(char)
            temp = []
        else:
            temp.append(char)
    answer.append(''.join(temp))
    return answer

In [4]: print separate("Now is the winter of our discontent", set(' '))
['Now', ' ', 'is', ' ', 'the', ' ', 'winter', ' ', 'of', ' ', 'our', ' ', 'discontent']

In [5]: print separate("Now, really - it is the winter of our discontent", set(' ,-'))
['Now', ',', '', ' ', 'really', ' ', '', '-', '', ' ', 'it', ' ', 'is', ' ', 'the', ' ', 'winter', ' ', 'of', ' ', 'our', ' ', 'discontent']

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
This might start to be slow when you use string.punctuation + string.whitespace as seps argument -- for each character, you're searching through a list of separators in linear time. –  DzinX Nov 1 '12 at 22:52
    
Not if you pass them in as a set –  inspectorG4dget Nov 2 '12 at 2:53
from itertools import chain, cycle, izip

s = "Now is the winter of our discontent"
words = s.split()

wordsWithWhitespace = list( chain.from_iterable( izip( words, cycle([" "]) ) ) )
# result : ['Now', ' ', 'is', ' ', 'the', ' ', 'winter', ' ', 'of', ' ', 'our', ' ', 'discontent', ' ']
share|improve this answer
    
-1: Works only for spaces as separators. –  DzinX Nov 1 '12 at 22:47

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