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I have this javascript class:

var Server = (function () {

var spawn = require('child_process').spawn;

function Server(serverDefinition) {
    this.definition = serverDefinition;
    this.status = false;
}

Server.prototype.start = function () {
    this.process = spawn('java', ['-jar', this.definition.jarfile]);
    this.status = true;

    this.process.on('exit', function(code, signal){
        this.status = false;
        console.log('Server stopped: code=' + code + ', signal=' + signal);
    });

    this.process.stdout.on('data', function(data){ console.log('stdout: ' + data);});
    this.process.stderr.on('data', function(data){ console.log('stderr: ' + data);});
};

return Server;

})();

My problem is that this inside of this.process.on('exit', ... ) referes to process, not Server as I would like it to.

What is the best pattern of dealing with this case? A _self = this ? In that case, where should that line be inserted, and should I stop referring to this and only use _self instead?

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1  
similiar stackoverflow.com/questions/13167630/… –  Musa Nov 1 '12 at 22:32

1 Answer 1

You could create a local variable that holds a reference to the this in the functions scope, this will work because in JavaScript, the scope of a variable is defined by its location within the source code, and nested functions have access to variables declared in their outer scope.[1]

Server.prototype.start = function () {
    var serv = this; // Reference to local object for use in inner-functions

    this.process = spawn('java', ['-jar', this.definition.jarfile]);
    this.status = true;

    this.process.on('exit', function(code, signal){
        serv.status = false;
        console.log('Server stopped: code=' + code + ', signal=' + signal);
    });

    this.process.stdout.on('data', function(data){ console.log('stdout: ' + data);});
    this.process.stderr.on('data', function(data){ console.log('stderr: ' + data);});
};

In my opinion it is best practice to keep refering to this where ever possible to make clear what you are refering to, one might miss a re-assignment of the used local variable while debugging making it hard to find errors.

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+1. If you use this pattern consistently, others will soon learn to look for the lcoal assignment. I also like the use of the constructor name for the instance (Server -> server) so it's obvious that it's the instance (once you know the pattern) so server.process = … and server.status = … reinforce the scheme. –  RobG Nov 1 '12 at 23:20
    
Bonus question: I have changed my code as you suggest, and it no longer makes a new status property on the process object. But it doesn't change the right status property either. I get the log-statement, but this.status, or serv.status, remains true. Is there anything else that is wrong? I also tried to clear the process property in the exit event, but that lead to big trouble... –  Vegar Nov 5 '12 at 20:13
    
Bonus answer: I put the serv variable outside of the start function. I must say I have trouble understanding this... (pun not intended...) –  Vegar Nov 5 '12 at 20:59
    
Where did you put it then? If it is global you will overwrite the current value whenever you start a new server. –  clentfort Nov 5 '12 at 22:49

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