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I Have an issue with the use of SimpleTimeZone class in Java. First, the JavaDoc is nice but not quite easy to understand in regards of the start and end Rules. But with the help of some example found on the web, i managed to get it right (i still don't understand why 8 represents the second week of a month in day_of_month!!! but whatever)

Now i have written a simple Junit test to validate what i understand:

package test;

import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;

import java.sql.Timestamp;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.GregorianCalendar;
import java.util.SimpleTimeZone;

import org.apache.log4j.Logger;
import org.junit.Test;



public class SimpleTimeZoneTest {

Logger log = Logger.getLogger(SimpleTimeZoneTest.class);

@Test   
public void testTimeZoneWithDST() throws Exception {


    Calendar testDateEndOut = new GregorianCalendar(2012, Calendar.NOVEMBER, 4, 01, 59, 59);
    Calendar testDateEndIn = new GregorianCalendar(2012, Calendar.NOVEMBER, 4, 02, 00, 00);
    Calendar testDateStartOut = new GregorianCalendar(2012, Calendar.MARCH, 11, 01, 59, 59);
    Calendar testDateStartIn = new GregorianCalendar(2012, Calendar.MARCH, 11, 02, 00, 00);

    SimpleTimeZone est = new SimpleTimeZone(-5 * 60 * 60 * 1000, "EST");
    est.setStartRule(Calendar.MARCH, 8, -Calendar.SUNDAY, 2 * 60 * 60 * 1000);
    est.setEndRule(Calendar.NOVEMBER, 1, Calendar.SUNDAY, 2 * 60 * 60 * 1000);

    Calendar theCal = new GregorianCalendar(est);

    theCal.setTimeInMillis(testDateEndOut.getTimeInMillis());

    log.info(" Cal date = " + new Timestamp(theCal.getTimeInMillis()) + " : " + theCal.getTimeZone().getDisplayName());
    log.info(" Cal use DST = " + theCal.getTimeZone().useDaylightTime());
    log.info(" Cal In DST = " + theCal.getTimeZone().inDaylightTime(theCal.getTime()));
    log.info("offset = " + theCal.getTimeZone().getOffset(theCal.getTimeInMillis()));
    log.info("DTS offset= " + theCal.getTimeZone().getDSTSavings());
    assertEquals("End date Should be In DST", true, theCal.getTimeZone().inDaylightTime(theCal.getTime()));

    theCal.setTimeInMillis(testDateEndIn.getTimeInMillis());

    log.info(" Cal date = " + new Timestamp(theCal.getTimeInMillis()) + " : " + theCal.getTimeZone().getDisplayName());
    log.info(" Cal use DST = " + theCal.getTimeZone().useDaylightTime());
    log.info(" Cal In DST = " + theCal.getTimeZone().inDaylightTime(theCal.getTime()));
    log.info("offset = " + theCal.getTimeZone().getOffset(theCal.getTimeInMillis()));
    log.info("DTS offset= " + theCal.getTimeZone().getDSTSavings());
    assertEquals("End date Should be Out DST", false, theCal.getTimeZone().inDaylightTime(theCal.getTime()));

    theCal.setTimeInMillis(testDateStartIn.getTimeInMillis());

    log.info(" Cal date = " + new Timestamp(theCal.getTimeInMillis()) + " : " + theCal.getTimeZone().getDisplayName());
    log.info(" Cal use DST = " + theCal.getTimeZone().useDaylightTime());
    log.info(" Cal In DST = " + theCal.getTimeZone().inDaylightTime(theCal.getTime()));
    log.info("offset = " + theCal.getTimeZone().getOffset(theCal.getTimeInMillis()));
    log.info("DTS offset= " + theCal.getTimeZone().getDSTSavings());
    assertEquals("Start date Should be in DST", true, theCal.getTimeZone().inDaylightTime(theCal.getTime()));

    theCal.setTimeInMillis(testDateStartOut.getTimeInMillis());

    log.info(" Cal date = " + new Timestamp(theCal.getTimeInMillis()) + " : " + theCal.getTimeZone().getDisplayName());
    log.info(" Cal use DST = " + theCal.getTimeZone().useDaylightTime());
    log.info(" Cal In DST = " + theCal.getTimeZone().inDaylightTime(theCal.getTime()));
    log.info("offset = " + theCal.getTimeZone().getOffset(theCal.getTimeInMillis()));
    log.info("DTS offset= " + theCal.getTimeZone().getDSTSavings());
    assertEquals("Start date Should be Out DST", false, theCal.getTimeZone().inDaylightTime(theCal.getTime()));





}

}

Ok, i want to test the date limits to see if the inDaylightTime return the right thing!

So, my rules are :

DST start the second sunday of March at 2am DST end the first sunday of november at 2am

In 2012 (now) this give us the march 11 at 2am and November 4 at 2am

You can see my test dates are set properly!!!

Well here is the output of my test run:

2012-11-01 18:22:44,344 INFO [test.SimpleTimeZoneTest] - < Cal date = 2012-11-04 01:59:59.0 : Eastern Standard Time>
2012-11-01 18:22:44,345 INFO [test.SimpleTimeZoneTest] - < Cal use DST = true>
2012-11-01 18:22:44,345 INFO [test.SimpleTimeZoneTest] - < Cal In DST = false>
2012-11-01 18:22:44,345 INFO [test.SimpleTimeZoneTest] - <offset = -18000000>
2012-11-01 18:22:44,345 INFO [test.SimpleTimeZoneTest] - <DTS offset= 3600000>

My first assert just fails and tell me that 2012-11-04 01:59:59 is not inDST... !!!!???

If i put 2012-11-04 00:59:59, the test pass!

This 1 hour gap just puzzle me... can anyone explain this behavior?

Oh, btw, if anyone could elaborate on the :

est.setStartRule(Calendar.MARCH, 8, -Calendar.SUNDAY, 2 * 60 * 60 * 1000);

Why 8 means second week of march... and the -SUNDAY. I can't figure out this thing on a real calendar example!!!

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My first assert just fails and tell me that 2012-11-04 01:59:59 is not inDST... !!!!???

On November 4th at what-would-be 2:00 AM, we "fall back" to 1:00 AM, so the time 1:59:59 happens twice, once within DST and once after DST; so, this statement:

Calendar testDateEndOut =
    new GregorianCalendar(2012, Calendar.NOVEMBER, 4, 01, 59, 59);

is genuinely ambiguous. As it happens, the JDK decides that it refers to the second occurrence of 1:59:59, the one that's outside DST, which is why you're seeing that result.

Edited to add: You could remove this ambiguity, and make certain you get the first occurrence, by initially setting testDateEndOut to 00:00:00 and then writing testDateEndOut.setTimeInMillis (testDateEndOut.getTimeInMillis() + 7199000L) to move it forward by the desired amount.

Oh, btw, if anyone could elaborate on the :

est.setStartRule(Calendar.MARCH, 8, -Calendar.SUNDAY, 2 * 60 * 60 * 1000);

Why 8 means second week of march... and the -SUNDAY.

java.util.SimpleTimeZone supports a lot of different cases, so it uses some magic. You're using the four-argument version of setStartRule, so your arguments are as follows:

  • startMonth - you already understand this. MARCH means March.
  • startDay - note: day, not week. 8 means the eighth day of the Month.
  • startDayOfWeek - you use a negative value to indicate that you want a day on or after the above-specified date. -SUNDAY means a Sunday on or after.
  • startTime - you understand this.

Altogether, (Calendar.MARCH, 8, -Calendar.SUNDAY, 2 * 60 * 60 * 1000) means 2:00 AM on the first Sunday on or after March 8th — which is the Sunday in the range [March 8th, March 14th] — which is the second Sunday in March.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this great answer. You confirm what i tough about the 1 hr gap... And for the 8th day of march vs -SUNDAY. I understand what you tell me.. but my logic would push me to write Calendar.SUNDAY not -Calendar.SUNDAY. For me the - sign tell me to to go backward from the 8th of march... but that is just me.. ;-) –  Cygnusx1 Nov 2 '12 at 0:49
    
@Cygnusx1: You're welcome! And yeah, the arguments are complicated and hard-to-remember. I think there should probably have been separate methods for the different types of day-of-week selection algorithms. Though on the other hand, this isn't the sort of method that gets called very often, so maybe it doesn't matter too much? –  ruakh Nov 2 '12 at 1:31

I haven't checked everything else, but the immediate first problem is that you're creating all your Calendar values in the default time zone... which means that when you write:

theCal.setTimeInMillis(testDateEndOut.getTimeInMillis());

... that's already have going to applied your system default time zone.

I would strongly suggest that you get rid of theCal entirely, and change your code to:

SimpleTimeZone est = new SimpleTimeZone(-5 * 60 * 60 * 1000, "EST");
est.setStartRule(Calendar.MARCH, 8, -Calendar.SUNDAY, 2 * 60 * 60 * 1000);
est.setEndRule(Calendar.NOVEMBER, 1, Calendar.SUNDAY, 2 * 60 * 60 * 1000);

Calendar testDateEndOut = new GregorianCalendar(est);
testDateEndOut.set(2012, Calendar.NOVEMBER, 4, 01, 59, 59);
Calendar testDateEndIn = new GregorianCalendar(est);
testDateEndIn.set(2012, Calendar.NOVEMBER, 4, 02, 00, 00);
Calendar testDateStartOut = new GregorianCalendar(est);
testDateStartOut.set(2012, Calendar.MARCH, 11, 01, 59, 59);
Calendar testDateStartIn = new GregorianCalendar(est);
testDateStartIn.set(2012, Calendar.MARCH, 11, 02, 00, 00);

That may not fix the problems, but at least it will make it easier to reason about them.

Alternatively, you could use a calendar in UTC and use the UTC instants around the DST transitions to test your time zone.

Aside from anything else, I would strongly advise you to use Joda Time instead of java.util.* for all date/time work. It's a much nicer API - although the documentation for DateTimeZoneBuilder can also be a bit tricky.

share|improve this answer
    
I assume that his default time-zone is Eastern Time; he's trying to validate his ability to create a SimpleTimeZone whose rules replicate Eastern Time. The initial stuff with testDateEndOut etc. is intentionally in the default time-zone, so he can get the appropriate timestamps-in-milliseconds to use in validating his SimpleTimeZone instance. (Do you see what I mean?) –  ruakh Nov 1 '12 at 23:03
    
I would try Joda Time, but from the Doc i am not sure this api can help with what i need to do. Basically, i read 2 timestamps from an external xml in GMT. a beginDate and an endDate. I need to simply convert these date in my local time zone (EST) with DST in mind. I didnt read anything in Joda that can help me with this.. but i will give it a try. Thanks again for your response. –  Cygnusx1 Nov 2 '12 at 12:01
    
@Cygnusx1: It will absolutely do that - you should parse your data into DateTime values using UTC, and then convert them using DateTime.withZone(yourZone). –  Jon Skeet Nov 2 '12 at 12:05

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