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I am doing a Monte Carlo experiment to calculate an approximation of PI. From SICP:

The Monte Carlo method consists of choosing sample experiments at random from a large set and then making deductions on the basis of the probabilities estimated from tabulating the results of those experiments. For example, we can approximate using the fact that 6/pi^2 is the probability that two integers chosen at random will have no factors in common; that is, that their greatest common divisor will be 1. To obtain the approximation to , we perform a large number of experiments. In each experiment we choose two integers at random and perform a test to see if their GCD is 1. The fraction of times that the test is passed gives us our estimate of 6/pi^2, and from this we obtain our approximation to pi.

But when I run my program I obtain values like 3.9...

Here is my program:

(define (calculate-pi trials)
  (define (this-time-have-common-factors?)
    (define (get-rand)
      (+ (random 9999999999999999999999999999999) 1))
    (= (gcd (get-rand) (get-rand)) 1))
  (define (execute-experiment n-times acc)
    (if (> n-times 0)
        (if (this-time-have-common-factors?)
            (execute-experiment (- n-times 1) acc)
            (execute-experiment (- n-times 1) (+ acc 1)))
        acc))
  (define n-success (execute-experiment trials 0))
  (define prob (/ n-success trials))
  (sqrt (/ 6 prob)))

My interpreter is MIT/GNU 7.7.90

Thanks for any help.

share|improve this question
    
I can't get your code to run in DrScheme. Here's the error code: define: expected only one expression for the function body, but found at least one extra part in: (define (execute-experiment n-times acc) (if (> n-times 0) (if (this-time-have-common-factors?) (execute-experiment (- n-times 1) acc) (execute-experiment (- n-times 1) (+ acc 1))) acc)) So make sure that conditional is doing what you think it's supposed to be doing. –  Kyle Walsh Aug 23 '09 at 14:26
2  
It's not helpful, but your question made me think of this: wikihow.com/Calculate-Pi-by-Throwing-Frozen-Hot-Dogs. If I can't help, at least I can offer a laugh. –  duffymo Aug 23 '09 at 14:26
    
Those last two defines aren't valid because they need to evaluate previous definitions. –  Nietzche-jou Aug 23 '09 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Well, to answer your question directly, you have the if-statement backwards; it should be this way.

    (if (this-time-have-common-factors?)
        (execute-experiment (- n-times 1) (+ acc 1)
        (execute-experiment (- n-times 1) acc))

So you're calculating 1 - 6/π2 in the limit as the # of trials approaches infinity. This yields "pi" = sqrt(6/(1 - 6/π2)) = sqrt(6π2/(π2-6)) = 3.911).


Let's take a step back here, though, and look at what the Monte Carlo method does for us with this calculation (hint: expect very slow convergence. How many times are you running it?)...

Each trial either gives us 0 or 1, with probability p = 6/π2. This is an example of a Bernoulli process, which has, for the number of 1's m in a number of trials n, a binomial distribution.

Consider ρ = m/n, the fraction of times passing the common-divisors test. This a has mean value of p and a variance of p(1-p)/n, or std dev σρ = sqrt(p(1-p)/n). For n = 10000, you should expect a std dev of 0.00488. 95% of the time you will be within 2 std devs of the mean, and 5% of the time you'll be outside 2 std devs, or between 0.5982 and 0.6177. So an estimate of π from this method, given n=10000, will be between 3.117 and 3.167 95% of the time and outside this range 5% of the time.

If you want increase the number of trials by 100, that reduces std dev by a factor of 10 and the estimate of π gets narrowed between 3.1391 and 3.1441 with 95% confidence.

Monte Carlo methods are nice for a rough estimate but they need LOTS and lots of trials for an accurate answer, and usually reach a point of diminishing returns.

Not that this is a fruitless way to approximate pi, just be aware of the issue.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your reply and the additional info! –  Castro Aug 23 '09 at 16:43
    
> How many times are you running it? (calculate-pi 99999999) 1 ]=> ;Value: 3.141544196485725 –  Castro Aug 23 '09 at 18:11

I find my error. Thanks to all. I was incrementing the successful cases in the wrong place.

The corrected code is:

(define (calculate-pi trials)
  (define (this-time-have-common-factors?)
    (define (get-rand)
      (+ (random 9999999) 1))
    (= (gcd (get-rand) (get-rand)) 1))
  (define (execute-experiment n-times acc)
    (if (> n-times 0)
        (if (this-time-have-common-factors?)
            (execute-experiment (- n-times 1) (+ acc 1))
            (execute-experiment (- n-times 1) acc))
        acc))
  (define n-success (execute-experiment trials 0))
  (define prob (/ n-success trials))
  (sqrt (/ 6 prob)))
share|improve this answer
    
yup, you got it! –  Jason S Aug 23 '09 at 16:38

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