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UPDATE Hm, I have an update. Apparently my huge array of "unsigned long long fhash[105][100555]" was not getting initialized to zero automatically in vC++... It worked when I did = {0}. Isn't it supposed to initialize automatically?

I'm doing contest programming, and I usually compile with g++ at school/ideone etc... but I have to use a VC++ 2010 compiler.

That said, I have code to do polynomial rolling hashing (like used in Rabin-Karp), but do these overflow differently on these compilers?

Code is here: http://pastebin.com/UFdpwHCt (hashing is around line 67)

Output is here: http://i.imgur.com/KCcvI.png

How come "bhash" is equal between the two compilers, but "fhash" isn't? They are hashed using the same method... In the G++-3 output, the "fhash" and "bhash" outputs are the same (they are supposed to be) but in the VC++-10 output the "fhash" and "bhash" aren't the same...

I'm using the overflow to let it mod itself naturally, to speed up execution, instead of explicitly modding it with a large prime.

share|improve this question
    
include <stdint.h> and use uint??_t of whatever size you need. (Probably this is not relevant, but I'm think it worth reading in your case. Section regarding your question is here). – elmigranto Nov 1 '12 at 23:07
    
Hm, I have an update. Apparently my huge array of "unsigned long long fhash[105][100555]" was not getting initialized to zero automatically in vC++... It worked when I did = {0}. Isn't it supposed to initialize automatically? – dave Nov 1 '12 at 23:48
1  
No, it won't be zeroed implicitly (unless you allocate memeroy with calloc, but why you wanna do it in C++?). Memory block will contain random stuff, actually, which could happen to be all zeroes, but you should never rely on that, of course. (See ISO C++ Standard for details.) – elmigranto Nov 2 '12 at 13:58
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Wasn't an issue. the issue was that it wasn't getting initialized to zero. fixed it using memset.

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