Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I recently started learning Java and found it very strange that every Java class must be declared in a separate file. I am a C# programmer and C# doesn't enforce any such restriction.

Why does Java do this? Were there any design consideration?

Edit (based on few answers):

Why is Java not removing this restriction now in the age of IDEs? This will not break any existing code (or will it?).

share|improve this question
6  
IMHO, probably the worst design decision in the history of computing was for Java to force the file to class mapping. –  anon Aug 23 '09 at 14:35
9  
@Neil - That's a bit harsh. Have you used Lotus Notes? –  oxbow_lakes Aug 23 '09 at 14:41
3  
@Andre - well, when I hear the phrase "Worst design decision in the history of computing", Lotus Notes just springs to mind. –  oxbow_lakes Aug 23 '09 at 14:57
5  
Even in C# it's usually considered a bad idea to have more than one top-level type in a file, unless they're delegates. –  Jon Skeet Aug 23 '09 at 15:05
4  
@Jon Skeet I can't speak for C#, but in C++ there is no such opinion. Multiple related classes in the same file make a lot of sense. –  anon Aug 23 '09 at 15:12

11 Answers 11

up vote 23 down vote accepted

According to the Java Language Specification, Third Edition:

This restriction implies that there must be at most one such type per compilation unit. This restriction makes it easy for a compiler for the Java programming language or an implementation of the Java virtual machine to find a named class within a package; for example, the source code for a public type wet.sprocket.Toad would be found in a file Toad.java in the directory wet/sprocket, and the corresponding object code would be found in the file Toad.class in the same directory.

Emphasis is mine.

It seems like basically they wanted to translate the OS's directory separator into dots for namespaces, and vice versa.

So yes, it was a design consideration of some sort.

share|improve this answer
2  
Does anyone have experience of using Java on platforms that don't have tree-structured directores? Perhaps someone that works on something like VM/CMS (or maybe it does have tree structures now - last time I used it was about 1988) could comment? –  anon Aug 23 '09 at 15:33
2  
Or I would say when they develop Java they are lazy :) –  Athiwat Chunlakhan Aug 23 '09 at 15:58
    
@Neil: Visual Age didn't store its files in the file system, but in a (proprietary) Database instead. It still presented your classes hierarchically, due to the package system however. –  Joachim Sauer Oct 21 '09 at 7:16
    
You know, from the effect this consideration had, I think it does totally enforce programmers to rethink about coupling code. People who DON'T think it's a good idea to write their classes, as in at least one-file-per-public-class-basis, obviously haven't been on large projects long enough to get fed up with rereading large code files just to change "that small thing" (or are ignorant about it). It's not about lazyness, it's about not mundanely repeating yourself –  Spoike Oct 21 '09 at 7:34

I have just taken a C# solution and did just this (remove any file that had multiple public classes in them) and broke them out to individual files and this has made life much easier.

If you have multiple public classes in a file you have a few issues:

  1. What do you name the file? One of the public classes? Another name? People have enough issues around poor solution code organization and file naming conventions to have one extra issue.

  2. Also, when you are browsing the file / project explorer its good that things aren't hidden. For example you see one file and drill down and there are 200 classes all mushed together. If you have one file one class, you can organize your tests better and get a feel for the structure and complexity of a solution.

I think Java got this right.

share|improve this answer
9  
exactly. More classes within the same file is a nightmare. It just complicates life, I don't see any advantage in doing so. –  Juri Aug 23 '09 at 16:00
1  
I totally agree. –  javashlook Aug 23 '09 at 19:38
5  
Yeah, it makes total sense to me. Not just because I'm a Java programmer, but because it makes the naming scheme just sort of fall into place on its own. –  MattC Aug 24 '09 at 0:45
4  
On the other hand, I still think decision should be left to the developer, not enforced. –  Ula Krukar Aug 25 '09 at 17:40
4  
maybe, but flexibility is not always the best thing. More and more we are seeing the benefits of solutions built on convention over configuration. –  leora Aug 25 '09 at 20:15

From Thinking in Java

:

There can be only one public class per compilation unit (file).
The idea is that each compilation unit has a single public interface represented by that public class. It can have as many supporting “friendly” classes as you want. If you have more than one public class inside a compilation unit, the compiler will give you an error message.


From the specification (7.2.6)

When packages are stored in a file system (?7.2.1), the host system may choose to enforce the restriction that it is a compile-time error if a type is not found in a file under a name composed of the type name plus an extension (such as .java or .jav) if either of the following is true:

  • The type is referred to by code in other compilation units of the package in which the type is declared.
  • The type is declared public (and therefore is potentially accessible from code in other packages).
  • This restriction implies that there must be at most one such type per compilation unit.
  • This restriction makes it easy for a compiler for the Java programming language or an implementation of the Java virtual machine to find a named class within a package; for example, the source code for a public type wet.sprocket.Toad would be found in a file Toad.java in the directory wet/sprocket, and the corresponding object code would be found in the file Toad.class in the same directory.

In short: it may be about finding classes without having to load everything on your classpath.

Edit: "may choose" seems like it leaves the possibility to not follow that restriction, and the meaning of "may" is probable the one described in RFC 2119 (i.e. "optional")
In practice though, this is enforced in so many platform and relied upon by so many tools and IDE that I do not see any "host system" choosing to not enforce that restriction.


From "Once upon an Oak ..."

It's pretty obvious - like most things are once you know the design reasons - the compiler would have to make an additional pass through all the compilation units (.java files) to figure out what classes were where, and that would make the compilation even slower.

(Note:

the Oak Language Specification for Oak version 0.2 (postcript document): Oak was the original name of what is now commonly known as Java, and this manual is the oldest manual available for Oak (i.e. Java).
For more history on the origins of Java, please have a look at the Green Project and Java(TM) Technology: An Early History
)

share|improve this answer
1  
@VonC: Just to be clear, the text that you quoted from the JLS says that a Java platform may forbid multiple classes per source file. It does not say that it must forbid this. (But you shouldn't do this anyway. If you do, your source code won't compile on some platforms; e.g. in typical IDEs.) –  Stephen C Aug 25 '09 at 6:27
    
'May' may have a different meaning in standards documents than in natural speech... –  EricSchaefer Aug 25 '09 at 6:31
    
@Stephen, Eric: I just added a small section about the meaning of "may" in specifications. It is true it does not say "must", but still... it seems enforces in too many place already. –  VonC Aug 25 '09 at 6:53
    
Thanks for the completeness of the answer, including the historical information about Oak. –  Jesper Aug 25 '09 at 7:20

It's just to avoid confusion in the sense that Java was created with simplicity in mind from the perspective of the developer. Your "primary" classes are your public classes and they are easy to find (by a human) if they are in a file with the same name and in a directory specified by the class's package.

You must recall that the Java language was developed in the mid-90s, in the days before IDEs made code navigation and searching a breeze.

share|improve this answer
2  
easier to find for whom? The compiler. –  Sandbox Aug 23 '09 at 14:37
4  
No - I just mean easier for the user - I've modified my answer –  oxbow_lakes Aug 23 '09 at 14:38
4  
IDEs have been around since the mid 80s (at least) - ever heard of Turbo Pascal? –  anon Aug 23 '09 at 14:38
    
IF the decision to put each public class in a file was JUST for 'easy to find (by a human)..' a newbie like me can say it wasn't a correct decision –  Sandbox Aug 23 '09 at 14:42
2  
@oxbow_lakes Look at stackoverflow.com/questions/1318712/…. Looks like it was for easier to find for compiler and not for human –  Sandbox Aug 23 '09 at 15:04

If a class is only used by one other class, make it a private inner class. This way you have your multiple classes in a file.

If a class is used by multiple other classes, which of these classes would you put into the same file? All three? You would end up having all your classes in a single file...

share|improve this answer

That's just how the language designers decided to do it. I think the main reason was to optimize the compiler pass-throughs - the compiler does not have to guess or parse through files to locate the public classes. I think it's actually a good thing, it makes the code files much easier to find, and forces you to stay away from putting too much into one file. I also like how Java forces you to put your code files in the same directory structure as the package - that makes it easy to locate any code file.

share|improve this answer

Why is java not removing this restriction now in the age of IDEs? This will not break any existing code (or will it?).

Now all code is uniform. When you see a source file you know what to expect. it is same for every project. If java were to remove this convention you have to relearn code structure for every project you work on, where as now you learn it once and apply it everywhere. We should not be trusting IDE's for everything.

share|improve this answer
3  
404 Restriction not found –  Sam Harwell Aug 23 '09 at 16:13

It is technically legal to have multiple Java top level classes in one file. However this is considered to be bad practice, and many Java tools (including IDEs) do not work if you do this.

The JLS says this:

When packages are stored in a file system (§7.2.1), the host system may choose to enforce the restriction that it is a compile-time error if a type is not found in a file under a name composed of the type name plus an extension (such as .java or .jav) if either of the following is true:

  • The type is referred to by code in other compilation units of the package in which the type is declared.
  • The type is declared public (and therefore is potentially accessible from code in other packages).

Note the use of may in the JLS text. This says that a compiler may reject this as invalid, or it may not. That is not a good situation if you are trying to build your Java code to be portable at the source code level. Thus, even if multiple classes in one source file works on your development platform, it is bad practice to do this.

My understanding is that this "permission to reject" is a design decision that is intended in part to make it easier to implement Java on a wider range of platforms. If (conversely) the JLS required all compilers to support source files containing multiple classes, there would be conceptual issues implementing Java on a platform which wasn't file-system based.

In practice, seasoned Java developers don't miss being able to do this at all. Modularization and information hiding are better done using an appropriate combination of packages, class access modifiers and inner or nested classes.

share|improve this answer
    
The JLS says nothing (normative) about the subject. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 23 '09 at 15:00
    
@Tom: really? Did you see my edit? –  Stephen C Aug 23 '09 at 15:04
    
Portable - for byte code this should be the same regardless of compiler. For source you would have some explaining to dó if it fails with javac –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Oct 21 '09 at 6:27
    
@Thorbjorn: I meant at the source code level. I'll edit my answer to make this crystal clear. –  Stephen C Oct 21 '09 at 7:01

Not really an answer to the question but a data point none the less.

I grepped the headers of my personal C++ utilty library (you can get it yourself from here) and almost all of the header files that actually do declare classes (some just declare free functions) declare more than one class. I like to think of myself as a pretty good C++ designer (though the library is a bit of a bodge in places - I'm its only user), so I suggest that for C++ at least, multiple classes in the same file are normal and even good practice.

share|improve this answer

It allows for simpler heuristics for going from Foobar.class to Foobar.java.

If Foobar could be in any Java file you have a mapping problem, which may eventually mean you have to do a full scan of all java files to locate the definition of the class.

Personally I have found this to be one of the strange rules that combined result in that Java applications can grow very large and still be sturdy.

share|improve this answer

There can be many public classes in a single file. However, top-level class per file. There can be as many public inner/nested classes per file as you like.

I think you like this link - http://stackoverflow.com/questions/968347/can-a-java-file-have-more-than-one-class

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.