Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table like this:

Id    Begin_Date    End_date    
1     01-JAN-12     05-JAN-12
1     01-FEB-12     01-MAR-12
1     15-FEB-12     05-MAR-12

For a given Id, it gives a set of date ranges. Let's say that if a date is between the begin and end date for that Id, then that Id is "on". Otherwise, "off"

The problem here is these last two rows -- the date ranges overlap and contradict each other. The second row claims that the 1 was "on" between 01-FEB-12 and 01-MAR-123, but the third row claims that 1 was off before before 14-FEB-12. Similarly, the second row claims that 1 was off on 02-MAR-12, but row 3 claims it was on.

The reconciliation logic I'd like to apply is that, in cases of contradictions, pick the earliest possible begin date and the earliest possible end date after it. The result would therefore be:

Id    Begin_Date    End_date    
1     01-JAN-12     05-JAN-12
1     01-FEB-12     01-MAR-12

I was able to pull this off with the lag analytical function, but I ran into difficulty with other use cases. Take this input data set.

Id    Begin_Date    End_date    
1     01-JAN-12     10-JAN-12
1     5-JAN-12      8-JAN-12
1     12-JAN-12     15-JAN-12
1     1-JAN-12      14-JAN-12

What I expect here as output is:

Id    Begin_Date    End_date    
1     01-JAN-12     8-JAN-12
1     01-JAN-12     14-JAN-12

...because the first row is the earliest begin date, and its end date is the earliest end date after that. The next row is the earliest begin date after the previous end date, and the end date of that row is the earliest end date after that. There are no begin dates after 14-JAN-12, so I'm done.

I'm having very little luck solving this problem. One approach I tried was getting the rank partitioned by id and compare it to the max rank. I then used the lag function to compare to previous ranks. However, this strategy totally fails for use cases above.

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
how about changing the structure so that the dates are all in the same column.. then the LAG should be much easier. –  Randy Nov 2 '12 at 0:54
2  
the second row of expected output should be 12-JAN-12 for Begin_Date? –  cctan Nov 2 '12 at 7:46
    
Your last table doesn't look right - after applying your algorithm I would expect the second row to begin on 12 Jan and end on 15 Jan. If this is not the case could you explain why. –  DaveRlz Nov 2 '12 at 9:30
    
you don't have enough rules. I propose the following rule: In every date where exists an interval which contains it, is ON. –  Florin Ghita Nov 2 '12 at 9:47
    
@cctan correct, sorry. –  Jeremy Nov 2 '12 at 18:05

2 Answers 2

Well, the critical requirement rests on this:

The reconciliation logic I'd like to apply is that, in cases of contradictions, pick the earliest possible begin date and the earliest possible end date after it.

sqlfiddle here

CREATE TABLE table1
(
  id INT,
  DateStart DATE,
  DateEnd DATE
);

INSERT INTO table1
VALUES
(1, TO_DATE('20110101','YYYYMMdd'), TO_DATE('20110110','YYYYMMdd'));
INSERT INTO table1
VALUES
(2, TO_DATE('20110105','YYYYMMdd'), TO_DATE('20110108','YYYYMMdd'));
INSERT INTO table1
VALUES
(3, TO_DATE('20110112','YYYYMMdd'), TO_DATE('20110115','YYYYMMdd'));
INSERT INTO table1
VALUES
(4, TO_DATE('20110101','YYYYMMdd'), TO_DATE('20110114','YYYYMMdd'));
INSERT INTO table1
VALUES
(5, TO_DATE('20110206','YYYYMMdd'), TO_DATE('20110208','YYYYMMdd'));
INSERT INTO table1
VALUES
(6, TO_DATE('20110201','YYYYMMdd'), TO_DATE('20110207','YYYYMMdd'));

The select statement:

SELECT ID, DATESTART, DATEEND
FROM 
(
  SELECT ID, TYPE, DATES AS DATESTART, 
         LEAD(DATES) OVER (ORDER BY DATES) AS DATEEND
  FROM
  (
    SELECT ID, TYPE,DATES,
      LAG(ID) OVER (ORDER BY DATES) AS LASTID,
      LAG(TYPE) OVER (ORDER BY DATES) AS LASTTYPE,
      LAG(DATES) OVER (ORDER BY DATES) AS LASTDATES
    FROM
    (
      SELECT ID,'START' AS TYPE,DATESTART AS DATES
      FROM table1
      UNION ALL
      SELECT ID,'END',DATEEND
      FROM table1
    )
  ) H
  WHERE TYPE != LASTTYPE OR LASTTYPE IS NULL
)
WHERE TYPE = 'START'
ORDER BY DATESTART

Here's a step by step for each subquery:

  1. explode each row's date start and date end into one column

  2. copy the last row using LAG and put it in current row

  3. filter out the rows which is are in the middle (e.g. 1,2,3,4 remove 2,3)

    get the end date in the next row because these are either first or last rows

  4. extract only useful rows, those rows which has TYPE = START

share|improve this answer
    
It's the strangest thing, but this query is not deterministic on the data set I'm running it on. Part of it, I'm sure, is that I neglected to mention that end_dates are optional. I'm working using your query to remedy that. (PS: genius idea to explode the dates out) –  Jeremy Nov 2 '12 at 17:57
    
I would have no idea how optional end_dates will work with your current requirements, but one idea is to set an arbitrary date as end_dates. Hope it works for you =) –  cctan Nov 5 '12 at 5:47

For the second data set:

Id    Begin_Date    End_date    
1     01-JAN-12     10-JAN-12
1     5-JAN-12      8-JAN-12
1     12-JAN-12     15-JAN-12
1     1-JAN-12      14-JAN-12

After your reconciliation logic, the result would be:

Id    Begin_Date    End_date    
1     01-JAN-12     8-JAN-12 (includes the rows 1,2 and 4 -> minimum begin_date is 1-JAN, minimum end_date is 8-JAN)
1     12-JAN-12     15-JAN-12 (includes row 3)
share|improve this answer
    
Perhaps better answered as a comment, but you are right. –  Jeremy Nov 2 '12 at 18:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.