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$('.tab').click(function() {
	$(this).unbind("click");
	var classy = $(this).attr("class").split(" ").splice(-1);
	var ihtml = $('.content.'+classy).html();
	$('#holder').html(ihtml);
	$('.tab').removeClass('highlight');
	$(this).addClass('highlight');
	$(this).unbind("click");
});

So in this code I have basically, a tabbed interface. When I click the tabs again the information in the #holder disappears. So what I would like to do is unbind clicks whenever the user clicks on the tab, and then bind it when they switch tabs. How can I integrate this into my code?

Thanks.

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Can you codify your text using the code button? Makes it nicer to read :-) –  James Wiseman Aug 23 '09 at 15:41
    
Heh, sorry, I thought I had. It's all code box'd now! :D –  Johnny Aug 23 '09 at 15:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could try adding a class 'active' when a tab is clicked (generally good practice), then use jQuery's live() to do some fancy stuff...

$('.tab:not(.active)').live('click', function () { 
    $('.tab').removeClass('active');
    $(this).addClass('active');
    ... 
});

I guess that does the trick.

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Oh Thanks that works perfectly. I'm such a newbie to jquery, it's nice to get some help sometimes :) –  Johnny Aug 23 '09 at 15:50
    
Hehe, that's what SO is for ;-) –  JorenB Aug 23 '09 at 15:53

also, you can try to use this kind of syntax (which should be faster and more memory&cpu friendly):

$('.tab').click(function(){
 var t=$(this);
 if(t.hasClass('active')){return false;}
 $('.active').removeClass('active');
 t.addClass('active');
 /* do some stuff here */
 return false;
});

Or even better, to avoid repeating yourself:

$('.tab').click(function(){
 var t=$(this);
 if(!t.hasClass('active')){
 $('.active').removeClass('active');
 t.addClass('active');
 /* do some stuff here */
 }
 return false;
});

Why is this faster & cpu friendly? Because you bind this only once. When you use live bind method, the browser will listen for any change in the DOM.

share|improve this answer
    
Is it? I thought live() is generally a better solution when dealing with multiple items, as it uses event delegation... live() only attaches one event, while binding click() to x tabs will create x events. Am I right? –  JorenB Aug 23 '09 at 16:21

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