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I asked a similar question a couple of days ago but I guess I'm still doing something wrong, so this one is more focused:

As far as I understand and according to this book, the function privateFunction is supposed to not be available from outside the mySingleton object, where publicFunction can only be called this way: mySingleton.publicFunction.

However - privateFunction is very available outside of the object against my will and intent.

Why is that? What am I doing wrong?

    var mySingleton = new (function (window, document, undefined) {

            var privateFunction = function () {
                //code
            },

            mySingleton = {
                publicFunction: function () {
                    //code
                }
            };

        return mySingleton;
    })(window, document, undefined);

EDIT: I just found the problem. Syntax error, how humiliating. Take a look at the semicolon on line 2. I missed out on this line when I was posting last night:

    var mySingleton = new (function (window, document, undefined) {
        var self = this;

        privateFunction = function () {
            //code
        },

        mySingleton = {
            publicFunction: function () {
                //code
            }
        }

        return mySingleton ;
    })(window, document, undefined);

Replacing the semicolon with a comma makes the private methods private "again". Regardless, looking at this code I would expect such a syntax to cause a syntax error, because of the comma right after privateFunction - am I getting this all wrong?

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closed as not a real question by Joseph Silber, lc., C-Pound Guru, Guvante, BNL Nov 2 '12 at 17:19

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
Are you running this in a browser? Can you show an example that makes you think this is public? –  Jeremy Banks Nov 2 '12 at 2:42
3  
@Der - For the same reason you need a private function anywhere: because you have some internal mechanism that isn't part of the public interface. –  Malvolio Nov 2 '12 at 2:50
5  
@pilau: The function is not available publicly. jsfiddle.net/3RwgQ –  I Hate Lazy Nov 2 '12 at 2:51
1  
As user1689607's fiddle demonstrates, the function is not available in global scope, nor can it be accessed by mySingleton.privateFunction(). Please show more code to demonstrate the problem you are having. Unrelated to that, why are you using new on the first line? Also unrelated, on the last line you probably want to pass just two arguments, (window, document), because that ensures that within the function undefined definitely will be undefined - this mechanism is used to protect against cases where other global code has set undefined to some other value. –  nnnnnn Nov 2 '12 at 3:11
1  
And about the comma. It's a valid operator. The comma operator works like this: given two statements (and variable assignments are statements) execute both and return the result of the second statement. So, it's valid syntax still. –  slebetman Nov 2 '12 at 8:53
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Have you ever seen this kind of code?

var toto = 'titi',
    titi = 'tata',
    tata = 'toto';

This is multiple assignments. This allows us to not reuse the var keyword every time. However, since you're not using the var keyword, privateMethod is actually leaked to the global scope. That's bad.

I think you're looking for this pattern:

var mySingleton = function() {
    function privateMethod() {}

    return {
        publicMethod: function() {}
    };
}();

The window, document and undefined crap is not needed.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought that every variable defined within a function is in the scope of that function (and it's children) only? Edit: slebetman answered this question in the comments above. –  pilau Nov 2 '12 at 8:53
    
Why are the window, document and undefined parameters unnecessary? –  pilau Nov 2 '12 at 8:57
    
@pilau for the parameters: james.padolsey.com/javascript/iife-argument-madness –  Florian Margaine Nov 2 '12 at 9:11
    
Actually there are many opinions in favor of taking this approach in the comments section of this very article –  pilau Nov 2 '12 at 11:33
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