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I'm currently trying to understand how to program in parallel in Haskell. I'm following the paper "A Tutorial on Parallel and Concurrent Programming in Haskell" by Simon Peyton Jones and Satnam Singh. The source code are as followed:

module Main where
import Control.Parallel
import System.Time

main :: IO ()
main = do
      putStrLn "Starting computation....."
      t0 <- getClockTime
      pseq r1 (return())
      t1 <- getClockTime
      putStrLn ("sum: " ++ show r1)
      putStrLn ("time: " ++ show (secDiff t0 t1) ++ " seconds")
      putStrLn "Finish."

r1 :: Int
r1 = parSumFibEuler 38 5300

-- This is the Fibonacci number generator
fib :: Int -> Int
fib 0 = 0
fib 1 = 1
fib n = fib (n-1) + fib (n-2)

-- Gets the euler sum
mkList :: Int -> [Int]
mkList n = [1..n-1]

relprime :: Int -> Int -> Bool
relprime x y = gcd x y == 1

euler :: Int -> Int
euler n = length $ filter (relprime n) (mkList n)

sumEuler :: Int -> Int
sumEuler = sum.(map euler).mkList

-- Gets the sum of Euler and Fibonacci (NORMAL)
sumFibEuler :: Int -> Int -> Int
sumFibEuler a b = fib a + sumEuler b

-- Gets the sum of Euler and Fibonacci (PARALLEL)
parSumFibEuler :: Int -> Int -> Int
parSumFibEuler a b =
  f `par` (e `pseq`(f+e))
    where
    f = fib a
    e = sumEuler b

-- Measure time
secDiff :: ClockTime -> ClockTime -> Float
secDiff (TOD secs1 psecs1) (TOD secs2 psecs2)
  = fromInteger (psecs2 -psecs1) / 1e12 + fromInteger (secs2- secs1)

I compiled it with the following command:

ghc --make -threaded Main.hs

a) Ran it using 1 core:

./Main +RTS -N1

b) Ran it using 2 core:

./Main +RTS -N2

However, the one core ran 53.556sec. Whereas, the two core ran 73.401sec. I don't understand how 2 cores can actually run slower then 1 core. Maybe the message passing overhead is too big for this small program? The paper have completely different outcomes compared to mines. Following are the output details.

For 1 core:

Starting computation.....
sum: 47625790
time: 53.556335 seconds
Finish.
  17,961,210,216 bytes allocated in the heap
      12,595,880 bytes copied during GC
         176,536 bytes maximum residency (3 sample(s))
          23,904 bytes maximum slop
               2 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

                                    Tot time (elapsed)  Avg pause  Max pause
  Gen  0     34389 colls,     0 par    2.54s    2.57s     0.0001s    0.0123s
  Gen  1         3 colls,     0 par    0.00s    0.00s     0.0007s    0.0010s

  Parallel GC work balance: -nan (0 / 0, ideal 1)

                        MUT time (elapsed)       GC time  (elapsed)
  Task  0 (worker) :    0.00s    (  0.00s)       0.00s    (  0.00s)
  Task  1 (worker) :    0.00s    ( 53.56s)       0.00s    (  0.00s)
  Task  2 (bound)  :   50.49s    ( 50.99s)       2.52s    (  2.57s)

  SPARKS: 0 (0 converted, 0 overflowed, 0 dud, 0 GC'd, 0 fizzled)

  INIT    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  MUT     time   50.47s  ( 50.99s elapsed)
  GC      time    2.54s  (  2.57s elapsed)
  EXIT    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  Total   time   53.02s  ( 53.56s elapsed)

  Alloc rate    355,810,305 bytes per MUT second

  Productivity  95.2% of total user, 94.2% of total elapsed

gc_alloc_block_sync: 0
whitehole_spin: 0
gen[0].sync: 0
gen[1].sync: 0

For 2 core:

Starting computation.....
sum: 47625790
time: 73.401146 seconds
Finish.
  17,961,210,256 bytes allocated in the heap
      12,558,088 bytes copied during GC
         176,536 bytes maximum residency (3 sample(s))
         195,936 bytes maximum slop
               3 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)

                                    Tot time (elapsed)  Avg pause  Max pause
  Gen  0     34389 colls, 34388 par    7.42s    4.73s     0.0001s    0.0205s
  Gen  1         3 colls,     3 par    0.01s    0.00s     0.0011s    0.0017s

  Parallel GC work balance: 1.00 (1432193 / 1429197, ideal 2)

                        MUT time (elapsed)       GC time  (elapsed)
  Task  0 (worker) :    1.19s    ( 40.26s)      16.95s    ( 33.15s)
  Task  1 (worker) :    0.00s    ( 73.40s)       0.00s    (  0.00s)
  Task  2 (bound)  :   54.50s    ( 68.67s)       3.66s    (  4.73s)
  Task  3 (worker) :    0.00s    ( 73.41s)       0.00s    (  0.00s)

  SPARKS: 0 (0 converted, 0 overflowed, 0 dud, 0 GC'd, 0 fizzled)

  INIT    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  MUT     time   68.87s  ( 68.67s elapsed)
  GC      time    7.43s  (  4.73s elapsed)
  EXIT    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  Total   time   76.31s  ( 73.41s elapsed)

  Alloc rate    260,751,318 bytes per MUT second

  Productivity  90.3% of total user, 93.8% of total elapsed

gc_alloc_block_sync: 12254
whitehole_spin: 0
gen[0].sync: 0
gen[1].sync: 0
share|improve this question
    
Do you have a CPU with two cores ? –  Jerome Nov 2 '12 at 3:26
    
Yep, well it's a laptop the cpu is APU E350. my machine is Asus 1215B. –  HHC Nov 2 '12 at 3:46
    
I gave it another try this time with larger numbers. r1 = sumFibEuler 45 8000. The results are 1 core 349.2701 sec 2 core 530.3064 sec. –  HHC Nov 2 '12 at 3:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted
r1 = sumFibEuler 38 5300

I believe that you meant

r1 = parSumFibEuler 38 5300


On my configuration (with parSumFibEuler 45 8000 and with only one run):

  • When N1 = 126.83s
  • When N2 = 115.46s

I suspect fib function to be much more CPU consuming than sumEuler. That'd explain the low improvement of -N2. There won't be some work-stealing in your situation.

With memoization, your fibonacci function would be much better but I don't think that's what you wanted to try.

EDIT: as mentioned in the comments, I think that with -N2 you have a lot of interruptions since you have two cores available.
Example on my configuration (4 cores) with sum $ parMap rdeepseq (fib) [1..40]

  • with -N1 it takes ~26s
  • with -N2 it takes ~16s
  • with -N3 it takes ~13s
  • with -N4 it takes ~30s (well, that Haskell program is not alone here)

From here:

Be careful when using all the processors in your machine: if some of your processors are in use by other programs, this can actually harm performance rather than improve it.

share|improve this answer
    
Ya I think the ratio of the two function could play a big part in the speed up process. –  HHC Nov 2 '12 at 4:20
    
Since your machine got two cores and -N specifies the number of OS thread your application is able to use (mapped on cores), you also might have some interruptions from other applications. –  Jerome Nov 2 '12 at 4:21
    
I'll edit that typo thanks for spotting it. –  HHC Nov 2 '12 at 4:59
    
I think that makes sense, I'll try it on my other machine that's a i5. –  HHC Nov 2 '12 at 5:10

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