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I have a testing harness, and for some reason this code is failing at finding prefixes and also omits short words. Any advice/tips/ideas?

def search( str ):
    """Search for a prefix string in the dictionary.
    Args:
        str:  A string to look for in the dictionary
    Returns:
        code WORD if str exactly matches a word in the dictionary,
            PREFIX if str does not match a word exactly but is a prefix
                of a word in the dictionary, or
        NO_MATCH if str is not a prefix of any word in the dictionary
    """

    left = 0
    right = len(dict) - 1
    mid = (left + right) // 2
    elem = dict[mid]
    while right >= left:
        if elem == str:
            return WORD
        elif elem < str:
            left = mid + 1
            mid = (left + right) // 2
        elif elem > str:
            right = mid - 1
            mid = (left + right) // 2
        elif elem == str[0:len(elem)]:
            return PREFIX
        elem = dict[mid]
        #print(left, right, mid)

    return NO_MATCH
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne Nov 2 '12 at 15:10

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I think the prefix will always be less than a full string, so the last elif won't ever be hit – noisecapella Nov 2 '12 at 3:14
1  
dict() is a builtin, you should avoid naming variables that override builtins. and str() as well.. – monkut Nov 2 '12 at 3:26
left = 0
right = len(dict) - 1
elem = dict[mid]
while right >= left:
    mid = (left + right) // 2  #compute one time
    if elem == str:
        return WORD
    elif elem < str:
        left = mid + 1
    elif elem > str:
        right = mid - 1
    elif elem == str[0:len(elem)]:
        return PREFIX
    elem = dict[mid]
    #print(left, right, mid)

return NO_MATCH

you don't have to compute and in the ifs the mid, but how the dict is structured? and how many chars must be a prefix, give some more info so we can help more.

share|improve this answer

Not really sure what's needed, but sliding windows are good for these kind of searches.

from itertools import islice


def window(seq, n=2):
    "Returns a sliding window (of width n) over data from the iterable"
    "   s -> (s0,s1,...s[n-1]), (s1,s2,...,sn), ...                   "
    it = iter(seq)
    result = tuple(islice(it, n))
    if len(result) == n:
        yield result    
    for elem in it:
        result = result[1:] + (elem,)
        yield result


WORD = "Found word!"
PREFIX = "Found prefix!"  
NO_MATCH = "No match found!"      

def search(search_for, search_in):
    assert len(search_for) < len(search_in)

    window_size = len(search_for)
    total_length = len(search_in)
    search_window = window(search_in, len(search_for))

    for idx, search_group in enumerate(search_window, window_size):
        joined_str = "".join(search_group)
        if joined_str == search_for:
            # found match, determine if there is any left
            if idx < total_length:
                return  PREFIX
            elif idx == total_length:
                return WORD            
    return NO_MATCH
share|improve this answer

Consider the contents of dict.txt being:

a
aa
aaa
aaaa
aaaaa

And you searched for the word "aac", and mid happened to pivot on aaa.

In a standard binary-search, the search space becomes:

aaaa
aaaaa

And aa nor a, both of which can be prefixes, will ever be found.

I think what you want will require a more involved algorithm. If you're going to base it on binary-searching, I'd probably start with the shortest length of str (a single character, at worst) and incrementally lengthen it as it find matches.

Although I think it'll be most efficient if you wrapped it all in the same left-right-pivot loop, you could even do it simply like this:

def search_prefix(str):
    longest_prefix = NO_MATCH
    for n in range(len(str)):
        prefix = search(str[:n])
        if prefix == NO_MATCH:
            break
        longest_prefix = prefix
    return longest_prefix

Note: I said single character at worst, but in reality, you could pre-cache the word lengths (hence prefix lengths) of dict.txt like so:

prefix_lengths = sorted(set(map(len, dict)))
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