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I am trying to make previous/next button for a project of mine. Here is trimmed down code for it.

<html>
<head>
<script>
function prevP() {var element = document.getElementById("framePage");
             element = element.src;
             elementLen = element.length;
             elementLen = elementLen-6;
             elementChar = element.charAt(elementLen)
             elementChar = --elementChar
             newElement = element.replace(element.charAt(elementLen),elementChar);
             document.getElementById("framePage").src=(newElement);}

function nextP() {var element = document.getElementById("framePage");
             element = element.src;
             elementLen = element.length;
             elementLen = elementLen-6;
             alert(elementLen);
             elementChar = element.charAt(elementLen)
             elementChar = ++elementChar
             newElement = element.replace(element.charAt(elementLen),elementChar);
             document.getElementById("framePage").src=(newElement);}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<iframe src="www.websiteendingwithnumber1.com" id="framePage"></iframe>
</br>
<input type="button" onClick="prevP()" value="Previous">
<input type="button" onClick="nextP()" value="Next">
</body>
</html>

My project creates roughly 40-120 html pages for display within the iframe. You use the Previous/Next button to flip through them. Each page is dynamically named with a number at the end. For example /path/mountpoint0/page/page0.html, page1.html ... page5.html, so on and so forth. What I am attempting to do is basically have each of these functions read the current URL of the iframe src, then set it to the desired src depending on the button you press. Basically if your at page5, it will slice up the string, and set the src to page4 if you hit previous, page6 if next, etc etc.

A caveat! I also have a dynamically generated mount point (ramdisk) for the dynamically generated iframe HTML files. My project will detect if a mount point exists and rename to a new mount point accordingly, IE if mountpnt0 exists, create and use mountpnt1, so on and so forth till it can. SO! The error I am seeing is that it changes the number on the mountpoint, and not the html file. Example iframe.src = /tmp/prevram0/html/page0.html. I click next, spits me to a page not found error and is trying to go to /tmp/prevram1/html/page0.html. I hit next again and then it flips the other number, /tmp/prevram1/html/page1.html. The desired operation would be, iframe.src = /tmp/prevram0/html/page0.html. I click next, it then sets iframe.src to /tmp/prevram0/html/page1.html.

I am sorry if this is convoluted or doesn't make much sense. Most of this project has been in python and I am looking to use HTML/JS to create the reporting feature of my project. I am fairly new to python, know my way around it decently enough, but JS is entirely new to me so I apologize for all my (likely) head ache causing noob mistakes. But I would really like some direction and guidance on how to best handle this problem :)

Thanks so much everyone!

EDIT - A quick clarification.

EDIT 2 - I want to thank everyone for their great input so far! I really, REALLY appreciate it! I am taking care of some stuff at work right now so when I get a chance to sit down with my project some more I will try out your suggestions and see what turns up :) Thanks again guys (and gals?)!

EDIT 3 - window.onload = function(){ pageNo = 0; baseUrl = document.getElementById('+q1+'baseurl'+q1+').innerHTML; }

window.onload = function(){
lPageNo = document.getElementById('+q1+'lPageNo'+q1+').innerHTML;
}

function prevP() {
if(pageNo > 1) { pageNo--; } 
var prevEl = document.getElementById('framePage'); 
prevEl.src = baseUrl + pageNo + '.html';
}

function nextP() {
if(pageNo<lPageNo) { pageNo++; }
var nextEl = document.getElementById('framePage');
nextEl.src = baseUrl + pageNo + '.html';
}

<span id="baseurl" style="display:none;">'+prevram+'/html/page</span>

<span id="lPageNo" style="display:none;">'+str(ptit)+'</span>

(prevram , q1, and ptit are python variables in my python script. prevram is the mount point and ptit is the page number counter. q1 is a single quote.)

share|improve this question
    
Err... can you clarify on when the mount point is determined? Is it done by javascript, or on the server side? –  user1600124 Nov 2 '12 at 3:38
    
@user1600124 - This script is actually run on a local machine. It is a python script and it generates and mount the mount point. Another part of the script generates the webpage and JS contained within which shows you the results of what the python script did, so the python script determines the mount point on your local machine and mounts it. - Edit for clarification. –  0xhughes Nov 2 '12 at 14:57
    
sorry, was away from computer for the weekend.. May I ask why you used document.getElementById('+q1+'lPageNo'+q1')? Because the span id is just "lPageNo"... is '+q1+' = '"'? –  user1600124 Nov 4 '12 at 13:23
    
@user1600124 Sorry, I copy and pasted from my script. That's python variable assignment, I had to use variables for the single quotes so it wouldn't break up my variable assignment as it is wrapped in single quotes. –  0xhughes Nov 4 '12 at 15:44
    
@user1600124 Got it, refer to your answer ;) Thanks! –  0xhughes Nov 4 '12 at 20:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Assuming that your mount point is determined by the server, I'd try it this way: Hide a element in the page containing a base string:

<span id="base" style="display:none;">/tmp/prevram0/html/page</span>

Then bind a handler to load event to get that information:

window.onload= function ()
{
    baseString = document.getElementById('base').innerHTML;
    document.getElementById('framePage').src = baseString + pageNo + '.html';

}

Where baseString is a variable defined somewhere in your code that is globally accessible to these functions. And pageNo is another variable predefined with initial page number.

Then prev page function:

function PrevP()
{
    if(pageNo > 1)
    {
         pageNo--;
    }
    var el = document.getElementById('framePage');
    el.src = baseString + pageNo + '.html';
}

Next Page function you just add the pageNo up and do the same thing:

function NextP()
{
    if(pageNo<lastPageNo)
    {
          pageNo++;
    }
    var el = document.getElementById('framePage');
    el.src = baseString + pageNo + '.html';
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input too :) This code looks pretty friendly to me, I will try it on for size and report the results! Thank so much again. –  0xhughes Nov 4 '12 at 1:48
    
Tried your code on, tweaked it a little bit, PROBABLY screwed it up, edit 3 contains the functions and HTML, it isn't working, I tried putting in some JS alerts in the next and previous functions to see if something was malformed but the alerts didn't even appear. Sorry to pester you! –  0xhughes Nov 4 '12 at 2:19
    
I got it working, single quote was messed up on one of my python variable declarations and one of my java variables was mismatched. Thanks a million user! –  0xhughes Nov 4 '12 at 20:01

JavaScript's String .replace() method searches the source string looking for whatever you pass in the first parameter. If that first param is a string then it only replaces the first instance of it. If that first param is a regex you can do more complicated pattern matches and global replaces. If the second parameter is a function you can do even more complicated replaces: the function will be called for each match, allowing you to process each match however you see fit and return the replacement value - which is perfect for your case where you want to increment or decrement a number.

Try this:

function prevP() {
    var element = document.getElementById("framePage");

    element.src = element.src.replace(/(\d+)(.html$)/,
                                  function(m,p1,p2){ return (+p1) -1 + p2; });
}
function nextP() {
    var element = document.getElementById("framePage");

    element.src = element.src.replace(/(\d+)(.html$)/,
                                  function(m,p1,p2){ return (+p1) +1 + p2; });
}

The regex I've used looks for digits followed by .html at the end of the source string, so in your case with a string in the form /tmp/prevram0/html/page0.html it will find only the second 0. The callback in the second parameter converts the digit string to a number using the unary plus operator, subtracts or adds 1 to it, and then puts the .html bit back.

Note that this doesn't do any range checking, so it'll keep trying to go previous even when already at 0.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/3VFvz/

Some other tips about your code:

  • Other than element, all of your variables are global because they are not declared in a var statement.
  • .charAt() returns a string, so it doesn't make sense to use the -- operator on the result.
  • You could say elementLen = element.length - 6, you don't need to do the -6 part as a separate statement.
  • It is a more normal JS style to put the first line of the function body on the line after the {, and put the function's closing } on its own line - except, possibly, for really short functions that are entirely on one line as above in my answer.
share|improve this answer
    
I was more thinking on the lines of having a baseString = "/tmp/prevram0/html/page". Then a var pageNo = whatever page you're on... then you just set the src = baseString + pageNo.toString() + '.html'... –  user1600124 Nov 2 '12 at 4:50
    
@user1600124 - Sure, that would work too, and would make it easier to add range checks for the first and last page - post it as an answer. (Note that you don't need the .toString() in your example.) –  nnnnnn Nov 2 '12 at 5:05
    
Hey, thank you for your response! Your code mostly makes sense to me except for the function(m,p1,p2) portions. Are m, p1 and p2 operators? I don't see them declared as variables anywhere, so i'm not sure what those mean! Sorry, total JS noob! What you said about the replace makes total sense, that is even what I was starting to suspect was not working right :) Thanks again for you input. –  0xhughes Nov 4 '12 at 1:48
    
m, p1 and p2 are function parameters - their declaration is in the function(m,p1,p2) part. That anonymous function is passed as a parameter to the replace() method as a "callback" - it will be called by replace() for each match, where m will be the whole match and p1, p2, etc., will be the sub-matches, so it can process whatever value(s) matched. Whatever value that function returns becomes the replacement value for the current match. –  nnnnnn Nov 4 '12 at 1:56
    
@nnnnnn That makes sense to me now, thank you for the clarification :) –  0xhughes Nov 10 '12 at 3:58

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