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So i want to do inventory program that uses a vector of class items in it. So far my code looks something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
class Item{
private:
  string month;
  string name;
  float volume;
  float sales;
public:
  void print();
  void print2();
  void sale();
  void report();
  void getdata();
  void setname (string itemname){name=itemname;}
  void setID(int setID){ID=setID;}
};
void Item::print(){
  cout<<"Name    : "<<name<<endl;
  cout<<"ID      : "<<ID<<endl;
}
void Item::print2(){
  vector<Item>*::iterator i;
    for (i=list.begin(); i !=list.end(); ++i){
      i->print();
  }
/*void Item::sale(){
  vector<Item> }

void Item::report(){
}*/
void Item::getdata(){
  vector<Item> items;
  string name;
  int ID;
  Item *a;
  for (int n=0; n<2; n++){
    cout<<"Enter name:"<<endl;
    getline(cin, name);
    cout<<"Enter ID: "<<endl;
    cin>>ID;
    a = new Item;
    a->setname(name);
    a->setID(ID);
    items.push_back(*a);
    cin.get();
  }
}

int main(){
  cout<<"0. Exit \n1. Item Sale \n2. Daily Report \n3. Weekly Check \n4. Monthly Update \n5. Load Inventory File \n6. S\
ort file by Key \n7. Save inventory to a file \n8. Add a New Item \n9. Edit an Item \n10. Delete an item\n";
  int x;
  cin>>x;
  switch(x){
  case 0:
    exit(0);
    break;
  case 1:
    sale();
    break;
  case 2:
    break;
  case 8:
    getdata();
    break;
  default:
    cout<<"Wrong choice!\n";
    break;
  }

the program doesn't compile because getdata() in case 8 doesn't call the function, why is that? Another question is so if i have stored data in getdata() function how can i use that data vector data in other function by dereferencing?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by jogojapan, Jesse Good, Blastfurnace, Donal Fellows, H.Muster Nov 2 '12 at 10:05

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would recommend splitting your object design into two parts: one to represent an Item, and one to represent the Inventory.

Item:

class Item
{
public:
  void print() const;
  void sale();
  void report();
  void setname (string itemname){name=itemname;}
  void setID(int setID){ID=setID;}

private:
  string month;
  string name;
  int ID;
  float volume;
  float sales;
};

void Item::print() const
{
  cout<<"Name    : "<<name<<endl;
  cout<<"ID      : "<<ID<<endl;
}

Inventory:

class Inventory
{
public:
  void print() const;
  void report();
  void getdata();

private:
  std::vector<Item> items;
};

void Inventory::print() const
{  
  for (
    vector<Item>::const_iterator iter = list.begin();
    iter != items.end();
    ++iter)
  {
      iter->print();
  }
}

.

void Inventory::getdata()
{
  string name;
  int ID;
  for (int n=0; n<2; n++)
  {
    cout<<"Enter name:"<<endl;
    getline(cin, name);
    cout<<"Enter ID: "<<endl;
    cin>>ID;
    Item item;
    item.setname(name);
    item.setID(id);
    items.push_back(item);
    cin.get();
  }
}

And here's what your main would look like:

int main()
{
  Inventory inventory;
  cout
      << "0. Exit \n"
      << "1. Item Sale \n"
      << "2. Daily Report \n"
      << "3. Weekly Check \n"
      << "4. Monthly Update \n"
      << "5. Load Inventory File \n"
      << "6. Sort file by Key \n"
      << "7. Save inventory to a file \n"
      << "8. Add a New Item \n"
      << "9. Edit an Item \n"
      << "10. Delete an item\n";
  int x;
  cin>>x;
  switch(x)
  {
  case 0:
    exit(0);
    break;
  case 1:
    sale();
    break;
  case 2:
    inventory.report();
    break;
  case 8:
    inventory.getdata();
    break;
  default:
    cout<<"Wrong choice!\n";
    break;
  }
}

Notice that you need an object of the class in order to call a member function. getdata() doesn't mean anything without the object on which it acts.

Edit: You asked "how would you iterator through the vector to find specific ID for example?"

We already see how to iterate through to call print on every member. All we really need to do is only call print sometimes.

First, you need a way to tell the ID of an Item. Add this after setID(...) in Item:

int getID() const {return ID;}

Now you can check this value while iterating:

void Inventory::find
(
  const int ID_
) const
{
  bool found = false;
  for (
    vector<Item>::const_iterator iter = items.begin();
    iter != items.end();
    ++iter)
  {
    if (iter->getID() == ID_)
    {
      cout << "Found item " << ID_ << ": \n";
      iter->print();
      found = true;
    }
  }
  if (!found)
  {
    cout << "No items matching " << ID_ << " found." << endl;
  }
}

You can see a working example here: http://codepad.org/w1MwGCYo

share|improve this answer
    
how would you iterator through the vector to find specific ID for example? ` int id; cout<<"Enter ID "; cin>>id; for (vector<Item>::const_iterator iter = items.begin(); iter !=items.end(); ++iter); {if (id==ID){ iter->print();} } }` That doesn't seem to work – Jack F Nov 2 '12 at 19:09

You need to fix your basics of OOP. You are not creating an object in main of class Item. Without this you cannot call a public member function.

One can only call static member functions without creating objects of class.

Secondly, creating a vector of the class itself inside a member function is insane. Do it outside the class if you have to.

Class defines the properties and behaviors of one instance. If you wish to create an array/vector of instances, it has to be done outside the class and then some member functions be called per instance.

You should create your class to handle one item with no vectors. The getdata function should also take input for one item. The you create a vector in your main. Then run a loop on this vector and call get_item or any other api's for each of these items. To elaborate, in the loop take input from console and pass that to vector[index].setitem()

share|improve this answer
    
so vector should be declared in class? – Jack F Nov 2 '12 at 4:24
    
No it should be declared outside your class. Class defines how the object looks like. Now it is extremely confusing that you use the same class to create an array of itself – fayyazkl Nov 2 '12 at 4:26
    
Perhaps if you can give an overview of what you want to do, i can help better. – fayyazkl Nov 2 '12 at 4:27
    
basically what i want to do is an inventory program, it should be able to add new items of the specific members as listed in the class. it should use a vector to store it so then i can sort the items and save it and then open it into size array of pointers to structures – Jack F Nov 2 '12 at 4:29
    
Okay, so you should create your class to handle one item with no vectors. The getdata function should also take input for one item. The you create a vector<item> in your main. Then run a loop on this vector and call get_item or any other api's for each of these items. To elaborate, in the loop take input from console and pass that to vector<item>[index].setitem() – fayyazkl Nov 2 '12 at 4:48

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