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I have a class called Contact, which is the superclass of classes named PersonalContact and BusinessContact.

I have one abstract method in my class which is supposed to tell the subclasses to implement it. The method is

public abstract Set<T> getEventsWithinPeriod(DateTime start, DateTime end);

The T is there to be interchanged with the different type of events in each subclass. PersonalContacts have birthdays, and BusinessContacts have meetings. The problem is I am getting an error saying T cannot be resolved to a type, but isn't that the whole point of generics?

I tried putting the in the class header as well

public abstract class Contact<T> implements Comparable<Contact>{

but the compiler gives me a warning saying

Contact is a raw type. References to generic type Contact<T> should be parameterized.

How do I fix this?

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you need to define a class T or an interface T i guess –  Bhavik Shah Nov 2 '12 at 4:51
    
You probably want public abstract class Contact<T> implements Comparable<Contact<T>> –  newacct Nov 2 '12 at 9:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you want to tie T with the subclass instead of getEventsWithinPeriod method, declare T as parameter for contact.

public abstract class Contact<T>
{
    public abstract Set<T> getEventsWithinPeriod();
}

class DOB
{
}
class BMeeting
{
}

class PersonalContact extends Contact<DOB>
{
    @Override
    public Set<DOB> getEventsWithinPeriod() 
    {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }
}


class BusinessContact extends Contact<BMeeting>
{
    @Override
    public Set<BMeeting> getEventsWithinPeriod() 
    {
        return null;
    }
}
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But Contact has lots of other methods and variables. Should I change everything now to Contact<T>? What about all the methods that don't use <T>? –  Imray Nov 2 '12 at 5:03
    
If subclass methods do not use <T>, you need not refer it. Like, sub class can simply have "void Aprocess()" method which is totally oblivious to the <T>. –  Htaras Nov 2 '12 at 5:07
    
What matters is, does sub class(E.g PersonalContact) deal with only BirthdayDays, or does it deal with both BirthDays, BusinessMeetings? –  Htaras Nov 2 '12 at 5:09
    
just birthdays . –  Imray Nov 2 '12 at 5:10
    
The problem with me making Contact a generic class like Contact<T> is that everywhere in the program, for example, a method in another class public Iterator<Contact> getContactIterator(){ now gives me an error saying Contact is a raw type. References to generic type Contact<T> should be parameterized –  Imray Nov 2 '12 at 5:12

It should introduce a formal type parameter:

public abstract <T> Set<T> getEventsWithinPeriod(Class<T> type, DateTime start, DateTime end);

It will actually work even without the parameter Class<T> type. But looks like you plan to instantiate that T inside the method (which you can't do because of type-erasure). So that paramter is there to help instantiate the actual-type reflectively at runtime.

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If T is parametrized at method level, client can pass any class to this method right? In this case client can pass BusinesMeeting class to PersonalContact object. I think this not intended as per OP. –  Htaras Nov 2 '12 at 5:02
    
And do I keep Contact<T> as the class name? –  Imray Nov 2 '12 at 5:04
    
@Htaras: It mentions "The T is there to be interchanged with the different type of events in each subclass.". But it's not quite clear. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 2 '12 at 5:05
    
@Imray: By public abstract <T> you are declaring a type-paramter (T) which is only valid within the scope of that method. If have T at the class level also, don't you use the same one for the method also. Either use something else, or make sure do you really need that. Try to make things clear in your question. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 2 '12 at 5:12
    
I don't want to have <T> at the class level because I don't want to go looking for everytime I use Contact and change it to Contact<T>. I want to just make a generic method - and only that method be generic. –  Imray Nov 2 '12 at 5:16

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