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My problem is that background image covers all ImageIcons I use in my JPanel. For example, in this code snippet, I'm trying to setIcon to one of the labels I have in my Panel. But the background image covers it. How can I fix this? It doesn't matter if I use label.setIcon() outside of paint method or inside of it.

public void paint(Graphics g) {
        super.paint(g);     
        g.drawImage(backgroundImage, 0, 0, this);
            label1.setIcon(iconImage);

}

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
2  
The method to override is paintComponent(), not paint(). The icon should not be set in the paintComponent() method. And try drawing the image before calling super.paintComponent(), so that the "normal" painting is made over your background image. (not tested though, which is why I don't post this as an answer) – JB Nizet Nov 2 '12 at 6:55
    
or override paintIcon() – mKorbel Nov 2 '12 at 7:37
  1. Set the layout of your base panel to BorderLayout
  2. Add a JLabel to the base pane, setting its icon to the background image
  3. Set the layout if the JLabel to what ever you need
  4. Add the remaining components to this label
share|improve this answer

Try placing the label.seticon outside the overridden method. Refer to:

How to set JFrame or JPanel Background Image in Eclipse Helios

you can implement it as;

 public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
 g.drawImage(img, 0, 0, null);
 }

OR

public void paint(Graphics g) { 
if (img!=null) g.drawImage(img, 0, 0, null); 
super.paint(g); 
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
You are required to honour the paint chain. By not calling super.paint you are violating this contract. The paint methods do a lot of important work (such as painting the child components, double buffering (in the case of JComponents) and opacity), you should never avoid calling their super implementations - IMHO – MadProgrammer Nov 2 '12 at 7:29
    
Got It! Thanks @MadProgrammer. – Purnesh Nov 2 '12 at 8:46

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