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Django by-default implements username as case sensitive, now for authentication I have written my own Authentication Backend to handle case insensitive usernames while authentication.

As shown in : http://blog.shopfiber.com/?p=220

Now, the problem is :

I have various views and util methods which compares username to some stings.

i.e.

request.user.username == username_from_some_other_system_as_str

Now, if username is yugal then:

request.user.username == 'Yugal' # Returns False

Now, it should return True [ What I wanted to achieve ]

For that I remember from C++ days, Operator Overloading. But I don't think simply doing that for django's auth user would be a good idea, since auth user is tightly bound with django. Also, overloading == will make it case-insensitive for the whole class not just for the username field.

So, how should I go about this username case-insensitivity even when compared throughout.

Note:

  • Creating a get_username method that returns lower-case username always is not possible, since it would require all code to be re-factored to use it. You can do it for your code for once, but not possible if you are using 3rd party django apps.

  • I know user.username.lower() = something.lower() is possible but is bug prone and not the write solution for something so often used in a multi-developer setup.

  • I have used SomeModel.objects.filter(username__iexact=username), wherever possible. But that still leaves the system vulnerable to a mistake by any of un-aware developer.

======================================

Figured out the solution conceptually, but could not make it work ( Help ) :

####### Custom CharField for username case-insensitivity #######
from django.db.models.fields import CharField
class iUnicode:
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value

    def __eq__(self, other):
        if isinstance(other, str) or isinstance(other, unicode):
            return self.value.lower() == other.lower()
        if isinstance(other, self.__class__):
            return other == self.value

    def __unicode__(self):
        return unicode(self.value)
    def __str__(self):
        return self.__unicode__()


class UsernameCharField(CharField):
    def to_python(self, value):  # Its not getting called
        unicode_val = super(CharField, self).to_python(value)
        return iUnicode(unicode_val)

if User._meta.local_fields[1].name == 'username':
    User._meta.local_fields[1] = UsernameCharField(max_length=30)
    User._meta.local_fields[1].model = User
################################################################

I assume to_python is used to convert the value received from database to unicode in python. But, I guess my to_python is not getting called.

This will also ensure case-insensitivity in 3rd party apps and would not require any re-factoring. It will patch the User at its core. I will be adding this to __init__.py of my first INSTALLED_APP

What am I doing wrong ?

share|improve this question
1  
Create seperate method on user class for comparing names and refactor all existing code. –  freakish Nov 2 '12 at 7:20
    
Refactoring all the code is not possible when using 3rd party django apps that might use it. –  Yugal Jindle Nov 2 '12 at 7:31
    
Let me add it to the question ! –  Yugal Jindle Nov 2 '12 at 7:31
2  
@YugalJindle Then always save lower case only ( and you may keep "real" username in seperate field ). The number of problems raises really fast. You should consider changing the design. –  freakish Nov 2 '12 at 8:04
1  
@YugalJindle So basically you are saying that you can't modify anything and yet you want solve this problem? :) –  freakish Nov 2 '12 at 12:33

3 Answers 3

There is a relatively clean way to do this:

# Case-insensitive django authentication, modified from
# http://justcramer.com/2008/08/23/logging-in-with-email-addresses-in-django/
# See also https://github.com/dabapps/django-email-as-username
# And https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/auth/customizing/#auth-custom-user
from django.contrib.auth.models     import User

class EmailOrUsernameModelBackend(object):
    def authenticate(self, username=None, password=None):
        username = username.lower()     # Force all usernames & email to all lower case
        if '@' in username:
            kwargs = {'email': username}
        else:
            kwargs = {'username': username}
        try:
            user = User.objects.get(**kwargs)
            if user.check_password(password):
                return user
        except User.DoesNotExist:
            return None

    def get_user(self, user_id):
        try:
            return User.objects.get(pk=user_id)
        except User.DoesNotExist:
            return None

def my_password_reset(request, **kwargs):
    # Override django.contrib.auth.views.password_reset not needed because django does
    # SELECT FROM "auth_user" WHERE UPPER("auth_user"."email"::text) = UPPER(E'xxx@emaple.com')
    # But note you may want to manually create an UPPER index in the database for speed.
    return password_reset(request, **kwargs)

Then set

AUTHENTICATION_BACKENDS = (
    'obviously.backends.EmailOrUsernameModelBackend',
    'django.contrib.auth.backends.ModelBackend',
)

You'll also have to force usernames to lower case in your registration workflow

This all works OK, but does not preserve the case given by the user, nor is it efficient in looking up in the database. The default django behavior is by design, see https://code.djangoproject.com/ticket/2273

share|improve this answer
    
Its not only about authentication. Its also about querying with username on anything. We can always do to_lower but its all about bugs which get in when people in large teams miss it at some point. –  Yugal Jindle Sep 11 '13 at 10:46
    
As I write above see code.djangoproject.com/ticket/2273 this is a design decision by djano... and none of the workarounds are pretty. I recommend saving all lower case for django's auth, and keeping the mixed case username in a private field. –  Bryce Sep 11 '13 at 18:32
    
Thanks for linking with an official verdict. They left it upto the developers in case it matters to their projects. So.. we have to use dirty solutions if we must. –  Yugal Jindle Sep 12 '13 at 7:30
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Finally got it :

With so much experimenting and minimum effect on User model, finally achieved it. [ Thanks to Mr. @freakish for a different thought ]

Here it is :

############ username case-insensitivity ############
class iunicode(unicode):
    def __init__(self, value):
        super(iunicode, self).__init__(value)
        self.value = value

    def __eq__(self, other):
        if isinstance(other, str) or isinstance(other, unicode):
            return self.value.lower() == other.lower()
        if isinstance(other, self.__class__):
            return other == self.value


def custom_getattribute(self, name):
    val = object.__getattribute__(self, name)
    if name == "username":
        val = iunicode(val)
    return val

def auth_user_save(self, *args, **kwargs): # Ensures lowercase usernames
    username = self.username
    if username and type(username) in [unicode, str, iunicode]:
        self.username = username.lower()   # Only lower case allowed
    super(User, self).save(*args, **kwargs)

User.__getattribute__ = custom_getattribute
User.save = MethodType(auth_user_save, None, User)
#####################################################

I tested it and it worked as expected. :D

So, here are the testcases :

from django.test.testcases import TestCase

def create_user(data='testuser'):
    email = '%s@%s.com' % (data, data)
    user = G(User, username=data, email=email, is_active=True)
    user.set_password(data)
    user.save()
    return user

class UsernameCaseInsensitiveTests(TestCase):

    def test_user_create(self):
        testuser = 'testuser'
        user = create_user(testuser)
        # Lowercase
        self.assertEqual(testuser, user.username)
        # Uppercase
        user.username = testuser.upper()
        user.save()
        self.assertEqual(testuser, user.username)

def test_username_eq(self):
    testuser = 'testuser'
    user = create_user(testuser)
    self.assertTrue(isinstance(user.username, iunicode))
    self.assertEqual(user.username, testuser)
    self.assertEqual(user.username, testuser.upper())
    self.assertTrue(user.username == testuser.upper())
    self.assertTrue(testuser.upper() == user.username)
    self.assertTrue(user.username == iunicode(testuser.upper()))
Implicit Case-insensitive queries for database
###################### QuerySet #############################
def _filter_or_exclude(self, negate, *args, **kwargs):
    if 'username' in kwargs:
        kwargs['username__iexact'] = kwargs['username']
        del kwargs['username']
    if args or kwargs:
        assert self.query.can_filter(),\
        "Cannot filter a query once a slice has been taken."
    from django.db.models import Q
    clone = self._clone()
    if negate:
        clone.query.add_q(~Q(*args, **kwargs))
    else:
        clone.query.add_q(Q(*args, **kwargs))
    return clone

from django.db.models.query import QuerySet
QuerySet._filter_or_exclude = _filter_or_exclude
#############################################################

This will allow, User.objects.get(username='yugal') & User.objects.get(username='YUGAl') yield the same user.

share|improve this answer

This monkey patching looks like a bad idea. You will definetly hit some problems in future ( Django does a lot of stuff behind the scene ). I highly recommend redesigning your app.

However here's what you can try ( using your iUnicode class ):

def new_getattribute( self, name ):
    val = object.__getattribute__( self, name )
    if name == "username":
        val = iUnicode( val )
    return val

User.__getattribute__ = new_getattr

Now, I'm not 100% that this will work, and it is a bit hacky, so use it with caution. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Well, your solution is similar - keeping all 3rd party apps independent. If this works it will be great. –  Yugal Jindle Nov 3 '12 at 4:30
    
This implements iUnicode in a different way. –  Yugal Jindle Nov 3 '12 at 4:35

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