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I'm trying to do a comparison in a function like this:

(defun omember (x l)
  (cond
    ((null l) nil)
    ((eq (car l) x) t)
    ((string< (car l) x) (omember (x (cdr l))))
    (t nil)))

It just go through the list and search if x in the elements in list l. The idea is since the list passed is sorted, you don't need to search all the list for a value. As long as your value are greater than the element you can return nil. However the "lessthan" function does not work. I tried "string<" and "<" for string and for integer. Also, I'm wondering if there is an mechanism that take integers in list to be string and compare them in string, because list passed in can be either in integers or in strings.

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Is *lessthan* a variable, holding a function object? –  Vsevolod Dyomkin Nov 2 '12 at 8:08
    
To compare integers as strings just prin1-to-string them before comparing. So you can do (mapcar #'prin1-to-string list), which will effectively coerce a it to a list of strings. –  Vsevolod Dyomkin Nov 2 '12 at 8:09
    
Thanks to @wvxvw comma is actually a typeo I changed it. –  user1011346 Nov 2 '12 at 16:28
    
And as to the function name, I try to avoid confusing people so make up a unreal one, but it seems to confusing people so I just copy my code into the field. Hope this make more sense –  user1011346 Nov 2 '12 at 16:39
    
Yes, I have a find function work well for this. But I have to use the fact here the list passed in is sorted; and avoid going through the whole list. That means I should return nil and end the search as soon as I found x is greater than the element in list. –  user1011346 Nov 2 '12 at 19:31

4 Answers 4

If you want this to work in a general way, you should pass the comparison function as a parameter:

(defun member-of-sorted (item list
                         &key (test #'=) (end-test #'<) (key #'identity))
  (loop :for tail :on list
        :for element := (funcall key (first tail))
        :until (funcall end-test item element)
        :when (funcall test item element)
        :do (return-from member-of-sorted tail))
  nil)

I tried to make this as similar as possible to the standard member. If you want to use it not on numbers but on other things, pass the appropriate :test and :end-test parameters. You could wrap a typecase form around this if you have different types at the same use place.

Edit: I should add usage examples:

(member-of-sorted 3 '(1 2 3 4 5 6))
=> (3 4 5 6)

(member-of-sorted 3/2 '(1 2 3 4 5 6))
=> NIL

(member-of-sorted "foo" '("bar" "baz" "foo" "quux")
                  :test #'string=
                  :end-test #'string<)
=> ("foo" "quux")

(member-of-sorted #\D '(#\A #\C #\E #\S)
                  :test #'char=
                  :end-test #'char<)
=> NIL

(member-of-sorted #\D '(#\A #\C #\D #\E #\S)
                  :test #'char=
                  :end-test #'char<)
=> (#\D #\E #\S)
share|improve this answer

You could use apply to apply a function object to a list of arguments:

((apply *lessthan* (list (car l) x)) (do something))

Or funcall, as wvxvw points out, which doesn't require building an additional list:

((funcall *lessthan* (car l) x) (do something))
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The thing is that I don't know what lessthan function to use to make it both works when a list of strings passed in and when a list of integers passed in. –  user1011346 Nov 2 '12 at 16:43

Use the following in your code to distinguish between the types:

[15]> (typep 7 'integer)
T
[16]> (typep "17" 'string)
T
share|improve this answer

There is an error use of parentheses around recursion omember.

(defun omember(x l)
  (cond
    ((null l) nil)
    ((= (car l) x) t)
    ((< (car l) x) (omember x (cdr l)))
    (t nil)
    )
  )

will make this work for list of integers

(defun omember(x l)
      (cond
        ((null l) nil)
        ((string= (car l) x) t)
        ((string< (car l) x) (omember x (cdr l)))
        (t nil)
        )
      )

will make it works for list of strings

but there seems no way to make it both works for list of strings and list of integers

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I've shown you (in my answer) the use of typep to distinguish between ints and strings. You just rename your two functions into omember-ints and omember-strings, and introduce an interface function omember which will inspect the first element of the argument list and call a correct function accordingly. This assumes all elements in the list are of same type. If x is always an integer, you'd need to translate it into string: 5 -> "5" or "00000005" or whatever your preference. But do notice that (string< "5" "51") ==> 1 and (string< "500" "51") ==> 1. –  Will Ness Nov 4 '12 at 9:51

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