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I have simple class that bean created allot , in this class I write to one central file I protect the file with mutex's,beacose few class instances can be doing write operation in the same time.
I don't pass the file reference into the class as argument .
what if I create the file as static member in the class , so it will be created once .
is it better ? this is what I have now :

CollectorWorker::CollectorWorker()
{
   m_pFileOutput = new QFile("my_result.txt");
   if (!m_pFileOutput->open(QIODevice::WriteOnly
                          | QIODevice::Text | QIODevice::Append))
   {
     LOG_MSG("my_result.txt can't be open")
   } 
}

//header
QFile* m_pFileOutput;

or this with static

QFile* CollectorWorker::m_pFileOutput = new QFile("my_result.txt");
CollectorWorker::CollectorWorker()
{
  if (!m_pFileOutput->open(QIODevice::WriteOnly
                         | QIODevice::Text | QIODevice::Append))
  {
    LOG_MSG("my_result.txt can't be open")
  } 
}

//header
static QFile* m_pFileOutput;
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Is it your intent to leak a file pointer for every CollectWorker object you make beyond the first one? because that is precisely what the first one will will do. Or is that QFile* in the class declaration and not out in global namespace? –  WhozCraig Nov 2 '12 at 7:58
    
The second one, on the other hand will not leak a file pointer, but will 'reopen' the file on each CollectWorker object creation created after the first. Again, is this your intent? –  WhozCraig Nov 2 '12 at 8:02
    
i just want that the file will created once , not each time i create CollectWorker object –  user63898 Nov 2 '12 at 8:02
    
You don't mean defining static QFile* m_pFileOutput; in the header. It has a whole different meaning from what you need. See here about initialization of static class members: stackoverflow.com/questions/1493045/… –  icepack Nov 2 '12 at 8:22
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4 Answers

That's fine and even preferred in your case. The file in the described situation is a shared resource and should be treated as one (and that's exactly what static is about in class scope). Having multiple handles to the same resource will only obfuscate and complicate the code.

Note however that this somewhat limits the flexibility of your code - e.g., if you'll need to access different files from different instances of your class.

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If you want a class (or global) file pointer accessed by all the CollectWorker objects you need to ,

  1. Initialize it outside the construction of even the first CollectWorker object. A class-static Init() member (and a matching Close()) would do this.
  2. If single-threaded, you can demand-create it in the constructor by checking the file pointer to see if it is already created and opened, and only if NOT, do so
  3. If multi-threaded, you need a class-level mutex that can be latched on constructor-enter, check the pointer, and only created it if it is NULL, then unlatch the mutex.

I think it odd you're using the same file object to reference the same file by multiple CollectWorker instances, each of which may be expecting the file pointer in a different state, and I think this is going to be just asking for trouble.. If this is read-only you'd be far better off having each CollectWorker just open the same file with their own QFile pointer (non-static), guaranteeing they all get their own pointers, and more importantly, read-offsets in the file at runtime.

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I think the question deals more with design aspects than with technical ones –  icepack Nov 2 '12 at 8:16
    
@icepack probably, and were it anything besides a file I would have probably made that a whole lot shorter =P –  WhozCraig Nov 2 '12 at 8:17
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When all members of a class are static you are losing the main OOP idea.

You can replace the class with some functions defined in the header.

As performance I don't think you will notice a difference.

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not all members only the file member –  user63898 Nov 2 '12 at 7:35
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Since you're using Qt, you could just use signals and slots with connection type Qt::QueuedConnection. That way, you can create a single output class and connect the various workers to it using QObject::connect. You'll be able to do away with the mutex locking because the Qt event loop handles all of that for you. Of course, this assumes that your worker threads are running Qt event loops of their own (the default in more recent versions of the Qt libs).

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