Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create 1000 threads using the pthread_create() function.

This is the statement I'm using:

for (int i=0 ; i <1000; i++)
{
   retValue = pthread_create(&threadId, NULL, simplethreadFunction, NULL);
}

Everytime this for-loop runs does it create a new thread?

This is a simple thing. But I'm unable to understand it.

share|improve this question
3  
Yes it creates 1000 threads, is there anything that makes you think it is not working? –  john Nov 2 '12 at 7:18
    
ok.. but i was told tat the above code is incorrect and i have to pass an array of values to the threadID some thing like this statement`for(i=0; i<1000; i++) { res = pthread_create(&a_thread[i], NULL, thread_function, NULL); } –  bunny Nov 2 '12 at 7:25
    
i'm trying to measure time it takes to create 1000 threads for (int i=0 ; i <1000; i++) { retValue = pthread_create(&threadId, NULL, simplethreadFunction, NULL); } if i use this way to create 1000 threads.. will i get the correct time it takes to create 1000 threads? –  bunny Nov 2 '12 at 7:29
    
@paddy Yes, that's right. Otherwise, how will you identify the threads? With your current code, all the threads are going to overwrite their IDs and you'll only have one thread ID which was created as last one. –  Blue Moon Nov 2 '12 at 7:30
1  
Note, that some operating system limit could be reached before 1000 threads can be created. You should check retValue and count how many threads actually are created successfully. –  hyde Nov 2 '12 at 7:34
show 3 more comments

1 Answer

Everytime this for-loop runs does it create a new thread?

Yes, it does.

This is a simple thing. But I'm unable to understand it.

I will add a few more points:

  1. First parameter to the function pthread_create is pointer type to pthread_t. Basically you are passing an address to this function, which this function uses to assign 'something'.

    When this function creates a thread, an 'opaque, unique identifier' for this thread is created and the pointer you passed is made to point to this location, so that you can access it later, if required.

  2. If you will pass the same pointer all the 1000 times, you will have access to the unique identifier for only one (the last one) thread created out of all 1000, because each time the previous value will get over written.

  3. This unique value is required if you would want to perform further operations on a thread (like joining etc).

  4. For details about this function and other thread related functions you can go though this and this.

  5. Don't forget to call pthread_exit in your main context, otherwise complete program (including the created threads) might terminate even before all your threads would have finished.

Also regarding the time, this thing might not have any effect on time of creation as far as I think, will just reduce the usability of threads you have created. Also, this time you are calculating is not THE time for creating 1000 threads, will depend on lot of other factors like platform/implementation etc.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the explanation .. –  bunny Nov 2 '12 at 14:46
    
@paddy Since, you seems to be a newcomer to this site, I would like to share this with you - meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… [At Others : Consider this as a bad attempt to get some rep :p] –  Amit Tomar Nov 5 '12 at 13:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.