Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
var x = 3;
(function (){
  console.log('before', x);
  var x = 7;
  console.log('after', x);
  return ;
})();

In the above code var X is initialized globally. So inside the function the first console.log should print "before 3" but i don't get it. The reason is that i am trying to re-declare the global variable.

Can somebody explain why this is happening?

share|improve this question
1  
Link answering your question: adequatelygood.com/2010/2/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting FWIW, you're looking at "hoisting". – Florian Margaine Nov 2 '12 at 10:16
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The JavaScript parser does Variable Hoisting when parsing your code. This means that any variable declaration will be moved to the top of the current scope, thus in your case, this code will get executed:

var x = 3;
(function (){
  var x;
  console.log('before', x);
  x = 7;
  console.log('after', x);
  return ;
})();

So your local variable x gets declared at first with an initial value of undefined.

This should explain, why you get an "beforeundefined" for the first console.log().

share|improve this answer

In the above code var X is initialized globally. so inside the function the first console.log should print "before 3".

No, it should print before undefined, because var takes effect from the beginning of the function regardless of where you write it.

Your code is exactly the same as this:

var x = 3;
(function (){
 var x;

 console.log('before', x);
 x = 7;
 console.log('after', x);
 return ;
})();

And of course, variables start with the value undefined.

Details: Poor misunderstood var

share|improve this answer
    
but then if that is the case then it should show before 7...right? – harikrish Nov 2 '12 at 10:17
1  
@harikrish Just the declaration is moved to the top, not the assignment! – Sirko Nov 2 '12 at 10:19
    
Wow, wasnt aware of this! Will refactor some code now! – clentfort Nov 2 '12 at 10:19
    
@harikrish: No, see the code I posted. As Sirko says, only the declaration takes effect from the top. The short version is: Upon entry to the function, before any step-by-step code is executed, all variables declared with var are instantiated (with the value undefined) and anywhere there's a var x = 7; statement, it becomes x = 7; (assignment rather than initialization). – T.J. Crowder Nov 2 '12 at 10:19

The scope of a variable is much simpler than in other languages. It doesn't start at declaration but is either :

  • the function in which you have the declaration
  • the global scope if the declaration isn't in a function

MDN :

The scope of a variable declared with var is the enclosing function or, for variables declared outside a function, the global scope (which is bound to the global object).

You can imagine that all variable declarations are moved to the start of the scope (the function). So this is exactly like

var x = 3;
(function (){
  var x;
  console.log('before', x); // now undefined
  x = 7;
  console.log('after', x); // now 7
  return ;
})();

Be careful to understand what is the exact scope (the function, not the block) :

var x = 3;
(function (){
  console.log('before', x); // this is undefined !
  if (true) {
      var x = 7;
  }
  return ;
})();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.