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Undefined Symbol ___gxx_personality_v0 on link

I am intending to declare a vector of atomic variables to be used as counters in a multithreaded programme. Here is what I tried:

#include <atomic>
#include <vector>

int main(void)
{
  std::vector<std::atomic<int>> v_a;
  std::atomic<int> a_i(1);
  v_a.push_back(a_i);
  return 0;
}

And this is the annoyingly verbose error message of gcc 4.6.3:

In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.6/x86_64-linux-gnu/./bits/c++allocator.h:34:0,
             from /usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/allocator.h:48,
             from /usr/include/c++/4.6/vector:62,
             from test_atomic_vec.h:2,
             from test_atomic_vec.cc:1:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ext/new_allocator.h: In member function ‘void __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::construct(__gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::pointer, const _Tp&) [with _Tp = std::atomic<int>, __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::pointer = std::atomic<int>*]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_vector.h:830:6:   instantiated from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(const value_type&) [with _Tp = std::atomic<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::value_type = std::atomic<int>]’
test_atomic_vec.cc:10:20:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ext/new_allocator.h:108:9: error: use of deleted function ‘std::atomic<int>::atomic(const std::atomic<int>&)’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/atomic:538:7: error: declared here
In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.6/vector:70:0,
             from test_atomic_vec.h:2,
             from test_atomic_vec.cc:1:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/vector.tcc: In member function ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::_M_insert_aux(std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::iterator, _Args&& ...) [with _Args = {const std::atomic<int>&}, _Tp = std::atomic<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::iterator = __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<std::atomic<int>*, std::vector<std::atomic<int> > >, typename std::_Vector_base<_Tp, _Alloc>::_Tp_alloc_type::pointer = std::atomic<int>*]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_vector.h:834:4:   instantiated from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(const value_type&) [with _Tp = std::atomic<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::value_type = std::atomic<int>]’
test_atomic_vec.cc:10:20:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/vector.tcc:319:4: error: use of deleted function ‘std::atomic<int>::atomic(const std::atomic<int>&)’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/atomic:538:7: error: declared here
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_vector.h:834:4:   instantiated from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(const value_type&) [with _Tp = std::atomic<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::value_type = std::atomic<int>]’
test_atomic_vec.cc:10:20:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/vector.tcc:319:4: error: use of deleted function ‘std::atomic<int>& std::atomic<int>::operator=(const std::atomic<int>&)’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/atomic:539:15: error: declared here
In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.6/x86_64-linux-gnu/./bits/c++allocator.h:34:0,
             from /usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/allocator.h:48,
             from /usr/include/c++/4.6/vector:62,
             from test_atomic_vec.h:2,
             from test_atomic_vec.cc:1:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ext/new_allocator.h: In member function ‘void __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::construct(__gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::pointer, _Args&& ...) [with _Args = {std::atomic<int>}, _Tp = std::atomic<int>, __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::pointer = std::atomic<int>*]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/vector.tcc:306:4:   instantiated from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::_M_insert_aux(std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::iterator, _Args&& ...) [with _Args = {const std::atomic<int>&}, _Tp = std::atomic<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::iterator = __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<std::atomic<int>*, std::vector<std::atomic<int> > >, typename std::_Vector_base<_Tp, _Alloc>::_Tp_alloc_type::pointer = std::atomic<int>*]’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_vector.h:834:4:   instantiated from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(const value_type&) [with _Tp = std::atomic<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::value_type = std::atomic<int>]’
test_atomic_vec.cc:10:20:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.6/ext/new_allocator.h:114:4: error: use of deleted function ‘std::atomic<int>::atomic(const std::atomic<int>&)’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/atomic:538:7: error: declared here
In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.6/vector:61:0,
             from test_atomic_vec.h:2,
             from test_atomic_vec.cc:1:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_algobase.h: In static member function ‘static _BI2 std::__copy_move_backward<true, false, std::random_access_iterator_tag>::__copy_move_b(_BI1, _BI1, _BI2) [with _BI1 = std::atomic<int>*, _BI2 = std::atomic<int>*]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_algobase.h:581:18:   instantiated from ‘_BI2 std::__copy_move_backward_a(_BI1, _BI1, _BI2) [with bool _IsMove = true, _BI1 = std::atomic<int>*, _BI2 = std::atomic<int>*]’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_algobase.h:590:34:   instantiated from ‘_BI2 std::__copy_move_backward_a2(_BI1, _BI1, _BI2) [with bool _IsMove = true, _BI1 = std::atomic<int>*, _BI2 = std::atomic<int>*]’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_algobase.h:661:15:   instantiated from ‘_BI2 std::move_backward(_BI1, _BI1, _BI2) [with _BI1 = std::atomic<int>*, _BI2 = std::atomic<int>*]’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/vector.tcc:313:4:   instantiated from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::_M_insert_aux(std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::iterator, _Args&& ...) [with _Args = {const std::atomic<int>&}, _Tp = std::atomic<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::iterator = __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<std::atomic<int>*, std::vector<std::atomic<int> > >, typename std::_Vector_base<_Tp, _Alloc>::_Tp_alloc_type::pointer = std::atomic<int>*]’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_vector.h:834:4:   instantiated from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(const value_type&) [with _Tp = std::atomic<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::value_type = std::atomic<int>]’
test_atomic_vec.cc:10:20:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_algobase.h:546:6: error: use of deleted function ‘std::atomic<int>& std::atomic<int>::operator=(const std::atomic<int>&)’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/atomic:539:15: error: declared here
In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.6/vector:63:0,
             from test_atomic_vec.h:2,
             from test_atomic_vec.cc:1:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_construct.h: In function ‘void std::_Construct(_T1*, _Args&& ...) [with _T1 = std::atomic<int>, _Args = {std::atomic<int>}]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_uninitialized.h:77:3:   instantiated from ‘static _ForwardIterator std::__uninitialized_copy<_TrivialValueTypes>::__uninit_copy(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _ForwardIterator) [with _InputIterator = std::move_iterator<std::atomic<int>*>, _ForwardIterator = std::atomic<int>*, bool _TrivialValueTypes = false]’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_uninitialized.h:119:41:   instantiated from ‘_ForwardIterator std::uninitialized_copy(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _ForwardIterator) [with _InputIterator = std::move_iterator<std::atomic<int>*>, _ForwardIterator = std::atomic<int>*]’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_uninitialized.h:259:63:   instantiated from ‘_ForwardIterator std::__uninitialized_copy_a(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _ForwardIterator, std::allocator<_Tp>&) [with _InputIterator = std::move_iterator<std::atomic<int>*>, _ForwardIterator = std::atomic<int>*, _Tp = std::atomic<int>]’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_uninitialized.h:269:24:   instantiated from ‘_ForwardIterator std::__uninitialized_move_a(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _ForwardIterator, _Allocator&) [with _InputIterator = std::atomic<int>*, _ForwardIterator = std::atomic<int>*, _Allocator = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >]’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/vector.tcc:343:8:   instantiated from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::_M_insert_aux(std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::iterator, _Args&& ...) [with _Args = {const std::atomic<int>&}, _Tp = std::atomic<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::iterator = __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<std::atomic<int>*, std::vector<std::atomic<int> > >, typename std::_Vector_base<_Tp, _Alloc>::_Tp_alloc_type::pointer = std::atomic<int>*]’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_vector.h:834:4:   instantiated from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(const value_type&) [with _Tp = std::atomic<int>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::atomic<int> >, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::value_type = std::atomic<int>]’
test_atomic_vec.cc:10:20:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_construct.h:76:7: error: use of deleted function ‘std::atomic<int>::atomic(const std::atomic<int>&)’
/usr/include/c++/4.6/atomic:538:7: error: declared here

How do I solve this?

The error disappears when I comment out the line with push_back() .

edit: I edited the post... For those of you who saw the first post, the error was embarrassingly that I used gcc instead of g++ :\

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by PlasmaHH, Frédéric Hamidi, Matthieu M., jrok, jacktheripper Nov 2 '12 at 12:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6  
You're using g++ to do the compile & link, right? –  Mat Nov 2 '12 at 10:37
    
have you tried to add -lstdc++ flag? –  Sebastiano Merlino Nov 2 '12 at 10:38
    
Nothing to do with atomics, at all. –  Matthieu M. Nov 2 '12 at 10:48
2  
Closing it as a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/12003024/… would at least make some sense, but closing it as a duplicate of a question about undefined symbols is complete nonsense. Voting to reopen. –  jogojapan Nov 2 '12 at 12:30
1  
@steffen: Please Oh Please, never completely change your question in between. You are not limited in the number of questions you can open, so if you progress further and have another question, then let the old one drop and ask a new one. This is not a forum, it's a QA website. –  Matthieu M. Nov 2 '12 at 13:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As described in this closely related question that was mentioned in the comments, std::atomic<T> isn't copy-constructible, nor copy-assignable.

Object types that don't have these properties cannot be used as elements of std::vector.

However, it should be possible to create a wrapper around the std::atomic<T> element that is copy-constructible and copy-assignable. It will have to use the load() and store() member functions of std::atomic<T> to provide construction and assignment (this is the idea described by the accepted answer to the question mentioned above):

#include <atomic>
#include <vector>

template <typename T>
struct atomwrapper
{
  std::atomic<T> _a;

  atomwrapper()
    :_a()
  {}

  atomwrapper(const std::atomic<T> &a)
    :_a(a.load())
  {}

  atomwrapper(const atomwrapper &other)
    :_a(other._a.load())
  {}

  atomwrapper &operator=(const atomwrapper &other)
  {
    _a.store(other._a.load());
  }
};

int main(void)
{
  std::vector<atomwrapper<int>> v_a;
  std::atomic<int> a_i(1);
  v_a.push_back(a_i);
  return 0;
}

EDIT: As pointed out correctly by Bo Persson, the copy operation performed by the wrapper is not atomic. It enables you to copy atomic objects, but the copy itself isn't atomic. This means any concurrent access to the atomics must not make use of the copy operation. This implies that operations on the vector itself (e.g. adding or removing elements) must not be performed concurrently.

Example: If, say, one thread modifies the value stored in one of the atomics while another thread adds new elements to the vector, a vector reallocation may occur and the object the first thread modifies may be copied from one place in the vector to another. In that case there would be a data race between the element access performed by the first thread and the copy operation triggered by the second.

share|improve this answer
    
that seems to do the job... Is there any downside to this solution? If not... why isn't this implemented in std::atomic in the first place? –  steffen Nov 2 '12 at 11:57
    
One problem is that _a.store(other._a.load()); doesn't look very atomic to me. Is this useful? –  Bo Persson Nov 2 '12 at 12:02
    
@steffen The only downside I am aware of is that the implementation will have to take all necessary precautions to ensure all copies and assignments are performed atomically. This may involve memory fences and locks and therefore slow down the insertion of elements in the vector as well as reallocation and copy operations performed on the vector itself. But that is what it means to work with atomics. You can pass special memory model parameters as arguments to the load and store calls to improve things, but choosing the right memory model (other than the safe default one) is an art. –  jogojapan Nov 2 '12 at 12:08
    
@BoPersson You are basically saying a mere assignment would perform the same operation as store, correct? Yes, I think that's right. Using store() explicitly helps emphasize that an atomic store operation happens there. –  jogojapan Nov 2 '12 at 12:10
1  
@BoPersson Ah. That's right. For the OP: Indeed this implementation enables concurrent access to the elements of the vector, but not the vector itself. If, say, one thread modifies the value stored in one of the atomics while another thread adds new elements to the vector, a vector reallocation may occur and the object the first thread modifies may be copied from one place in the vector to another. In that case there would be a data race between the element access performed by the first thread and the copy operation triggered by the second. –  jogojapan Nov 2 '12 at 13:26

Looks to me like atomic<T> has no copy constructor. Nor a move constructor, as far as I can tell.

One work around might be to use vector<T>::emplace_back() to construct the atomic in-place in the vector. Alas, I don't have a C++11 compiler on me right now, or I'd go and test it.

share|improve this answer
    
That seems to be the problem. putting v_a.push_back(std::move(a_i)); doesn't solve it though. –  steffen Nov 2 '12 at 11:21
    
@steffen You're right, atomic doesn't have a move constructor either. I have updated my answer with a work-around that is different to the accepted one. –  Kaz Dragon Nov 2 '12 at 12:09
    
I tried using emplace_back(1) instead of push_back(a_i), but GCC 7.2 rejects that, saying that the necessary unitialized-copy operation requires the copy constructor. I guess that is due to possible reallocations when a new element is inserted. Anyway, even if certain compilers accepted it, it would still be an incorrect use of std::vector, at least formally, because you are not supposed to use a non-copy-assignable element type. –  jogojapan Nov 2 '12 at 12:18
    
@jogojapan I just had a look at the C++ standard, and containers requirements are set on a per-operation basis (see section 23.2). That means, that there is no such a thing as an incorrect use of std::vector based on the element type. Of course, depending on the element type that you use, you will not be able to perform some operations. But if you do not need those operations, then using that element type should be totally fine. –  betabandido Feb 2 '13 at 18:59
    
@betabandido Yes, strictly speaking that's right. The requirements are defined per operation, because that is how templates work in C++ -- only functions actually used are instantiated. However, it seems pretty clear that the idea is to have certain requirements on a per-class basis, and to actually enforce these using the concept of "concepts" (which unfortunately didn't make it into C++11). If you use GCC with the -D_GLIBCXX_CONCEPT_CHECKS option, the compiler will perform a limited set of per-class checks, and that did include the copy-assignment check for vector the last time I checked. –  jogojapan Feb 3 '13 at 6:45

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