Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am implementing IValidatableObject on my model classes in asp.net web api. Some of the objects need to access a data repository in order to perform full validation.

How can resolve the DAL dependency before the call to IValidatableObject.Validate - or is there some other way to resolve the dependency in the Validate call?

Note that I am trying to use autofac, as per Inject into asp.net web api model with autofac but it looks to me like the model isn't invoked using the dependency resolver.

share|improve this question
1  
it seems to me that you will be interested in this one: aspnetwebstack.codeplex.com/workitem/463 I really need this feature to be implemented. If you are to, you can vote for that as well. –  tugberk Nov 2 '12 at 12:41

1 Answer 1

You model classes should not be part of dependency injection. Neither should they be responsible for their own validation (although decorating them with validation attributes -which is merely metadata- would be fine).

Instead define a proper abstraction to do validation. For instance, define this abstraction:

public interface IValidator<T>
{
    ValidationResult Validate(T instance);
}

This way you can have zero, one, or multiple implementations of of the IValidator<T> interface for a specific type, and you can register this all pretty effectively with Autofac.

When a type has no validations, you can let the container pass back a default -empty- implementation:

// Implementation of the Null Object pattern
public class EmptyValidator<T> : IValidator<T>
{
    public ValidationResult Validate(T instance)
    {
        return ValidationResult.ValidResult;
    }
}

When a type has multiple validators defined, you can wrap them in a composite:

// Implementation of the Composite pattern
public class CompositeValidator<T> : IValidator<T>
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<Validator<T>> col;

    public CompositeValidator(IEnumerable<Validator<T>> col)
    {
        this.col = col;
    }

    public ValidationResult Validate(T instance)
    {
        ValidationResult total = ValidationResult.ValidResult;

        foreach (var validator in this.col)
        {
            var result = validator.Validate(instance);
            total = ValidationResult.Append(total, result);
        }

        return total;
    }
}

Instead of injecting an IValidator<T> directly into your Web API Controllers, create a decorator that wraps around your IRepository<T> interfaces. This way you can add the validation behavior, without having to alter your repositories. Such implementation might look like this:

public class ValidationRepositoryDecorator<T>
    : IRepository<T>
{
    private readonly IRepository<T> decorated;
    private readonly IValidator<T> validator;

    public ValidationRepositoryDecorator(
        IRepository<T> decorated,
        IValidator<T> validator)
    {
        this.decorated = decorated;
        this.validator = validator;
    }

    public void Save(T instance)
    {
        var result = this.validator.Validate(instance);

        if (!results.IsValid)
            new ValidationException(result);

        this.decorated.Save(instance);
    }
}

Autofac allows you to register decorators for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed answer - I will upvote it for its useful content, however I have my reasons for wanting to move the validation logic from where it was originally implemented (at the top of POST and PUT methods) to the model classes, I'm not quite ready to give up on the convenience of IValidatableObject just yet as I would like all rules for a particular class (both those that are declared as attributes and those that require more elaborate codeing) in one place. –  dice Nov 2 '12 at 12:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.