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For example, compare these two:

function Person(name) {
 this.name = name;
}
var john = new Person('John');
console.log(john.constructor);
// outputs: Person(name)

var MyJSLib = {
 Person : function (name) {
   this.name = name;
 }
}
var john2 = new MyJSLib.Person('John');
console.log(john2.constructor);
// outputs: function()

The first form is useful for debugging at runtime. The 2nd form requires some extra steps to figure out what kind of object you have.

I know that I could write a descriptive toString function or call the toSource method on the constructor to get some more information, but I want the simplest way possible.

Is there a way to do this? Suggestions?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Well that happens because you are using an anonymous function.

You can specify names of anonymous functions (yes, it sounds odd), you could:

var MyJSLib = {
 Person : function Person (name) {
   this.name = name;
 }
}
var john2 = new MyJSLib.Person('John');
console.log(john2.constructor);

Anonymous functions can be named but those names are only visible within the functions themselves, and since you use the new operator, the constructor property will be set, and you will be able to see the name.

You could also compare the constructor reference using or not a name for the function:

console.log(john2.constructor === MyJSLib.Person); // true
share|improve this answer
    
+1, thx! I didn't try that, and I would have assumed (incorrectly) that form would introduce the Person constructor into the global namespace. Good to know. –  Keith Bentrup Aug 23 '09 at 20:08
    
Anonymous functions are anonymous for a reason :) What you have on the right hand side of this property assignment is merely a function expression (which by definition can have optional identifier) –  kangax Aug 25 '09 at 5:17

If you want to check whether an object is instance of a specific class then simply use "instanceof" keyword to check that. If you explicitly want a name for the constructor(which I really cannot see a point) you may try the code below

var MyJSLib = {
 Person : function Person(name) {
   this.name = name;
 }
}
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Do you mind explaining the -1? –  BYK Aug 23 '09 at 19:58
    
john2 instanceof MyJSLib.Person returns true. But I guess the OP doesn't want to test against a specific name –  Russ Cam Aug 23 '09 at 20:06
    
Well I gave the second answer which is the same as CMS's answer who sent it just after me. Thanks bro... –  BYK Aug 23 '09 at 20:08
    
I didn't downvote you, I was trying to provide additional detail toward your answer –  Russ Cam Aug 23 '09 at 20:14
    
So whoever did, thanks to him then =) And a "real" and a big thank you for trying to explain ;) –  BYK Aug 23 '09 at 20:17

what you want is the name of the holder in the namespace so.

function getName(namespace, obj) {
  for name in namespace:
    if (namespace[name] == obj) return name;
}
console.log(getNameOf(MyJSLib, john2.constructor));
share|improve this answer
    
This will absolutely NOT work in the code Keith Bentrup given. For it to work, you should look-up recursively. And that would be extremely slow. –  BYK Aug 23 '09 at 19:57
    
change the window to whatever the namespace variable is.nothing is recursive here. –  M. Utku ALTINKAYA Aug 23 '09 at 19:59
    
Well that is not a good way. And please read what I said: "it SHOULD be recursive" although it is not. –  BYK Aug 23 '09 at 20:01
    
define good way please, it is the actual name assigned to a variable, there is no other way. since he stated he does not want stingTo like methods return the class name. And where did he mention recursive thing, I do not see namespaces inside others. Even it was a requirement it is only possible to add those namespaces a predefined holder etc. I am nly making a point to show that name is only meaningful in the namespace, it is not a real identifier. –  M. Utku ALTINKAYA Aug 23 '09 at 20:08
    
Please see my answer and the accepted answer. If you can do something in one step for all conditions and if there is another way which needs recursion to handle all conditions, then the recursive way is of course "bad". –  BYK Aug 23 '09 at 20:12

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