Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In PHP, if there is a conditional like this:

if ( is_numeric($my_var) && $my_var == 1 ) {

}

If the first part of the if is false, does the second part ($my_var == 1) get ever executed?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
No it doesn't, that's "lazy evaluation" for you - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lazy_evaluation –  Mark Baker Nov 2 '12 at 11:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your example the $my_var == 1 will not be executed (if it's not numeric). PHP will determinate that the first part evaluated to false and so there is no benefit in executing the second part because you are using the && AND operator.

An example:

if(isset($_GET['something']) && $_GET['something'] == '1')
{

}

If the querystring variable something is missing then it doesn't check if it equals 1. If it did then it could produce an Undefined index notice.

You can also verify this behavior with something like:

$test = '2';
if($test == '1' && die('dead'))
{

}

echo 'execution continues....';

Set $test = '2' and the die() will not stop execution. Set it to 1 and the die will execute and stop, thus you won't see Execution continues...

Edit: there is some general information here (not PHP specific).

share|improve this answer
    
Can you point to documentation to back this up (answers supported by evidence at better answers)? I've had a look at the operators section of the PHP manual but I can't find any reference to this behaviour. –  Quentin Nov 2 '12 at 11:55
    
@Quentin I also can't find a reference, if anyone has one then feel free to throw it into the answer. –  MrCode Nov 2 '12 at 11:58

If the first condition is false second one will not be executed if you use &&. You can try it yourself:

function a(){
echo 'a';
return true;
}

function b(){
echo 'b';
return true;
}

if (a() && b())
{
    //do something
}

This will output: ab.

function a(){
echo 'a';
return false;
}

function b(){
echo 'b';
return true;
}

if (a() && b())
{
    //do something
}

Outputs a.

I gave you this example because I couldn't find anything in docs but the first comment in this section

This is called a call-by-need or lazy evaluation.

Note: In some cases it's useful or necessary that the second function is executed despite of the state of first condition. In that cases you can use & operator. With bitwise operators you work with numbers, not with booleans. Because php interpretator should know both value before and after & operator it will execute both functions (a() & b()) and true, false are evaluated as 1 and 0, respectively, 1 & 0 => 0 that will be evaluated as false in if statement.

share|improve this answer

You can use like

if ( is_numeric($my_var)) {

    if($my_var == 1)
        {
            // your code
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I know I can do this. I am wondering if I do it the other way what PHP does. –  Hommer Smith Nov 2 '12 at 11:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.