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Is storing a comma separated list in a database column really that bad?

I have a mysql db column of comma separated text:

  id  keys
 ------------
  1  Key1, Key2
  2  key3
  3  key2, key3, key4
  4  key5, key2

Question 1

I need results like this:

id    keys
----------
1    Key1
2    Key2
3    key3
4    key4
5    key5

Question 2

Also I need a second query to match the above condition. eg.

select all the rows with key2

Output should be

id
---
1
4

NOTE: Only in a single query, no stored procedures, no functions.

I have seen similar questions but with not the desired answer.

NOTE : Thanks for suggesting that data should not be stored in a comma seprated field. But I have not developed the system and database. I am just about to do a samll upgradation.

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marked as duplicate by podiluska, Jonathan Leffler, LittleBobbyTables, CJM, Maerlyn Nov 2 '12 at 22:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
why do you not want to use a function or stored procedure? –  bluefeet Nov 2 '12 at 11:58
1  
Why don't you store the data properly (ie: how you want the results to be in question 1). –  podiluska Nov 2 '12 at 12:03
3  
Read this please: Is storing a comma separated list in a database column really that bad? And the short answer is: Yes, it's really that bad. –  ypercube Nov 2 '12 at 12:05
2  
@ajreal I know it doesn't solve the issue, but limiting the tools that are allowed to be used makes this pretty much pointless. This could be solved by using a function. –  bluefeet Nov 2 '12 at 12:09
2  
@champ So what is your religious objection to functions? –  podiluska Nov 2 '12 at 12:34

1 Answer 1

Here's a temporary solution, until you redesign your tables. It will not perform very well, due to the CROSS JOIN. It also needs creating a new "Number" table:

CREATE TABLE Number
  ( i INT PRIMARY KEY );

Fill it with numbers up to expected maximum number of keys in a cell:

INSERT INTO Number
  VALUES
    (1), (2), ..., (1000) ;  

Then run this to give you the all distinct keys in the comma-separated column:

SELECT DISTINCT 
    SUBSTRING_INDEX(
          SUBSTRING_INDEX( 
                t.`keys`
              , ', '
              , n.i ) 
        , ', ' 
        , -1 ) AS `key`
FROM 
    Number AS n
  CROSS JOIN 
    YourTable AS t ;

Tested at: SQL-Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if this works, but the effort deserves a +1 –  Nicholas Pickering Aug 30 '13 at 5:57
    
@NicholasPickering Thnx. I added a test at SQLFiddle. –  ypercube Aug 30 '13 at 7:47

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