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Using the trigger noted below, I am tracking changes in a producution table in an audit, or change-log table. My problem is that the field names in the tracking table are different from the ones in table1. The values are the same, but the names of the columns are different.

The question is then, how must the syntax change in the trigger to take the value of one field name and insert it into a field of a different name in the tracking table?

Thank you for any and all help or suggestions.

{

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER track_change_trg
AFTER INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE
ON table1
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
 
IF INSERTING THEN
    INSERT INTO tracking table  VALUES 
    (:new.pname, :new.p_id, :new.p_type, :new.t1name,
    'INSERTED', SYSDATE);
 
ESLIF UPDATING THEN
    INSERT INTO tracking table  VALUES 
    (:new.pname, :new.p_id, :new.p_type, :new.t1name,
    'UPDATED', SYSDATE);
     
ELSIF DELETING THEN
    INSERT INTO tracking table VALUES 
    (:old.pname, :old.p_id, :old.p_type, :old.t1name,
    'DELETED', SYSDATE);
     
    END IF;
END;
/

}

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It makes no difference if the column names are different in the main and audit table. I'm not sure why you think that's a problem - showing any error might have helped clarifying your issue, along with the table definitions. The only error I can immediately see being thrown - assuming the space in tracking table is a mistake in transcription - is if the column order doesn't match and you're putting the wrong type or size of data in a column. Hard to guess what you're seeing though.

You've omitted the the optional column section in the insert statement that would normally list the column names. Without an explicit list of the column names, the values will be assigned based on the order of the columns in the target table, as shown in user_tab_columns.column_id or with describe. It would be better to list the columns to avoid ambiguity. and so you don't have problems if the table definition changes (e.g. a column is added, so you not don't have enough values) or the column order is different in another environment (which arguably shouldn't happen under decent source control). It's easier to spot trivial mistakes too.

Anyway, just list the column names from the table you're inserting into:

INSERT INTO tracking_table (x_name, x_id, x_type, x_t1name, x_action, x_when)
VALUES (:new.pname, :new.p_id, :new.p_type, :new.t1name, 'INSERTED', SYSDATE);

... replacing x_name etc. with the actual column names from tracking_table.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. My error was coming up due to my trying to use AS the same as is done in a SELECT statement. You cleared it up great for me... – Michelle Daniel Nov 2 '12 at 15:42

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