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I inherited some code from a coworker and I noticed that the way that some of the code is not consistent For example, is ther any functional difference between the following:

sum(case when (elephants = 0)then 1 else 0 end),

sum(case when (elephants = '0')then 1 else 0 end),

sum(case when (elephants IN (0))then 1 else 0 end),

sum(case when (elephants IN ('0'))then 1 else 0 end);

If there isn't a functional difference between using single qutoes or IN vs = when looking for a single value, what other reason could account for it (other than sloppy code)?

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What is the DBMS? Otherwise, these all do the same thing. –  Kermit Nov 2 '12 at 15:12
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

x IN (a, b, c) means x = a OR x = b OR x = c. When the IN list contains a single item, x IN (a) just means x = a.

As for the difference between 0 and '0', the former is an integer, the latter is a character string. The latter can be converted to an integer, so when elephants is an integer too, elephants = 0 and elephants = '0' also test the same thing.

There is no real difference between the four.

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Thanks, that helps a lot. –  The Nerge Nov 2 '12 at 15:38
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= is for single value but IN can have multiple values in a set.

example for =

a = b

but for IN, instead of writing multiple OR

a = 1 OR a = 2 or a = 3

you can write it as

a IN (1,2,3)

about single quotes, if the column's data type is numeric, the server automatically parses the string value into numeric value.

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In short:

= 0 //equal to the number zero
= '0' //equal to the string "0"
IN (0) //appears in the list in parenthesis. In this case, the single-item list of numerical zero
IN ('0') //appears in the list in parenthesis. In this case, the single-item list of string "0"
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