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I'm thinking of an aspect or interceptor in terms of Windsor that could catch known exceptions thrown from the web service and retrhow it wrapped in FaultException<T>.

Suppose there's a contract

[ServiceContract]
public interface IMyContract
{
    [OperationContract]
    [FaultContract(typeof(MyException))]
    void DoSome();
}

The interceptor bound to the implementing class would find FaultContractAttribute defined on DoSome operation and rethrow FaultException<MyException> when it catches MyException.

Does it make any sense at all? Are there any caveats?

Can you suggest an implementation that would recognize when it's executing in WCF context and do so in that case. And that would rethrow all exceptions when executing not as WCF service (in Unit tests, for example).

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What about WCF's IIErrorHandler isn't meeting your needs? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…. When you are running your unit test, WCF won't be there. So there's no need to filter FaultExceptions. –  ErnieL Nov 2 '12 at 16:33
    
Nice feature, thanks for pointing it out! What I need may be done as the attribute implementing IOperationBehavior and assigned per operation. That way it can read operation's FaultContract attributes. –  Mike Nov 2 '12 at 17:14
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1 Answer 1

You could try a Castle Windsor Interceptor like this:

public class FaultContractInterceptor : IInterceptor
{
    public void Intercept(IInvocation invocation)
    {
        try
        {
            invocation.Proceed();
        }
        catch (MyException myException)
        {
            var faultAttributes = invocation.Method.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (FaultContractAttribute), inherit: true) as FaultContractAttribute[];

            if (faultAttributes.Any(f => f.DetailType.FullName == typeof (MyException).FullName))
            {
                throw new FaultException<MyException>(myException, myException.Message);
            }
            else
            {
                throw;
            }
        }
    }
}
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