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I have the following.

package A;

sub new {
  my ($class) = @_;
  my $self = { };
  bless $self, $class;
  return($self);
}

sub run() {
  die "Task: ",__PACKAGE__,  "requires a run method";
}

package B;
use A;
our @ISA = qw(A);
sub new {
  my ($class) = @_;
  my $self = { };
  bless $self, $class;
  return($self);
}

package C;
use A;
my @Tasks;

sub new {
  my ($class) = @_;
  my $self = { };
  bless $self, $class;
  return($self);
}

sub add{
   my($self,$tempTask) = @_ ;
   push(@Tasks,$tempTask);
   $arraysize = @Tasks;
}

sub execute{
    foreach my $obj (@Tasks)
    {
            $obj->run();
    }
}
1;

Script

#!/usr/local/bin/perl
use strict;
use C;
use B;

my $tb = new C();
my $task = new B();
$tb->add($task);
$tb->execute();

Package B doesn't have a run method so it defaults to the Package A run method which is what I want. At this point I want it to print out the name of Package B (there will be many different packages inheriting Package A, but it doesnt.

Currently it prints out Package A using the __PACKAGE__ variable.

Any help?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

An object is a blessed reference. __PACKAGE__ will always equal the name of the current package. But ref( $object ) will give you the name of the class of object. There is also Scalar::Util::blessed, which will not give you false positives for non-blessed references.

use Scalar::Util qw<blessed>;

my $obj   = bless {}, 'A';
my $class = ref( {} );       # HASH
$class    = blessed( {} );   # ''
$class    = ref( $obj );     # A
$class    = blessed( $obj ); # A

So in your particular case:

sub run() {
    die "Task: " . ref( shift ) . "requires a run method";
}
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Replacing A::run code with this...

die "Task: ", ref shift,  " requires a run method";

... will give you the name of the package (class) the caller object belongs to (as first argument of each method called on object is that object itself, and ref will return its classname as a string)

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caller() is the general answer for this, as it can give you whichever stack frame you want, including the package name.

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It would give you 'C' in this case though. –  Axeman Nov 2 '12 at 16:03
    
If you use it as caller(EXPR), then EXPR tells you how many frames to go back. –  Mark Leighton Fisher Nov 2 '12 at 16:32
    
In the general case of calling an inherited method, how many stack frames do you go back to determine the name of the subclass on which that method was called? Don't forget to account both for the case in which the call falls through to the base class because no subclass overrode it and for the case in which one or more subclasses did override the method and used SUPER to explicitly call the parent's implementation. –  Dave Sherohman Nov 3 '12 at 10:08
    
It depends on how deep your hierarchy is. If you know that you have X calls within a class, then frame X+1 would be where the next set of class calls start. –  Mark Leighton Fisher Nov 6 '12 at 22:14

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