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I have few custom exceptions in PHP:

class MainException extends Exception {};
class ExceptionOne extends MainException {};
class ExceptionTwo extends MainException {};

And I'm using them in my class in two simple methods:

public function firstFunction($param) {
    if ($some_condition) {
        // do whatever
    } else {
        throw new ExceptionOne();
    }
}

public function secondFunction($param) {
    if ($some_condition) {
        // do whatever
    } else {
        throw new ExceptionTwo();
    }
}

I also have a PHPUnit test for both of exceptions, similar to this:

public function testFirstException() {
    try {
        // anything
    } catch (Exception $e) {
        $this->assertType('ExceptionOne', $e);
        $this->assertType('MainException', $e);
    }
}
public function testSecondException() {
    try {
        // anything
    } catch (Exception $e) {
        $this->assertType('ExceptionTwo', $e);
        $this->assertType('MainException', $e);
    }
}

If I test my class in browser and intentionally make my functions fail (with same stuff as in PHPUnit test) I can see ExceptionOne and ExceptionTwo are raised whenever needed. However, when I test it with PHPUnit I always get a failure:

1) testSecondException(SomeTest)
Failed asserting that <PHPUnit_Framework_ExpectationFailedException> is an instance of class "ExceptionTwo".
C:\test.php:67

Line 67 is
$this->assertType('ExceptionTwo', $e);
and it fails here no matter what I try. I'm pretty sure that my condition in secondFunction works correct. The first test (testFirstException) works perfectly and I never get a failure like in the second one.
I'd like to add that I shouldn't change PHPUnit test here!

What am I doing wrong here??

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From your comments to cbuckley's excellent answer, is appears that the test was written like this:

public function testFirstException() {
    try {
        // some code that is supposed to throw ExceptionOne
        $this->assertTrue(false, "Test failed");
    } catch (Exception $e) {
        $this->assertType('ExceptionOne', $e);
        $this->assertType('MainException', $e);
    }
}

The assertTrue is used to make sure the test fails if the exception isn't thrown during the test. However, this doesn't work because the failed assertion throws a different exception type which causes the error message to be confusing.

Failed asserting that <PHPUnit_Framework_ExpectationFailedException> 
is an instance of class "ExceptionOne".

You can fix this by using either @expectedException or setExpectedException. Not only will the test pass when ExceptionOne is thrown, but it will fail when it isn't thrown or some other exception type is thrown.

/**
 * @expectedException ExceptionOne
 */
public function testFirstException() {
    // some code that is supposed to throw ExceptionOne
}

When no exception is thrown the error message is

Failed asserting that exception of type "ExceptionOne" is thrown.

and when different type of exception is thrown you'll see

Failed asserting that exception of type "Exception" matches
expected exception "RuntimeException".

This method of testing exceptions is

  • easier to write,
  • easier to read,
  • easier to debug when the test fails,
  • and correct.
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's how my try block is written in test. Now I'm not sure myself anymore and will triple-check my class again... –  errata Nov 2 '12 at 16:27
    
GRRRR!!! A stupid typo in my regex pattern was causing this all the time >.-( I feel like a total noob now really :) Anyways, thanks one more time for all this great info about testing exceptions, will keep in mind that in the future for sure! –  errata Nov 2 '12 at 16:48
1  
I highly recommend that you share this advice with whoever wrote that test. You could have been saved from all this misery. –  David Harkness Nov 2 '12 at 19:40
1  
+1 for making my answer clearer :-) FWIW, I don't recommend using @expectedException, because it only asserts that such an exception is thrown somehwere in the test code. If using setExpectedException, you can precisely control when you expect the exception to be thrown by putting it immediately before the line that's expected to fail. –  cmbuckley Nov 3 '12 at 14:07
1  
Example: gist.github.com/4007523 –  cmbuckley Nov 3 '12 at 14:27

It looks like you're masking a different error inside your try/catch. If there is a test assertion within your try block, and that assertion fails, then it is thrown as an exception. Try using setExpectedException instead of a try/catch block:

public function testFirstException() {
    $this->setExpectedException('ExceptionOne');
    $fixture->firstFunction();
}

You should put the setExpectedException call immediately before the line which you expect to throw the exception.

Another alternative is to use the @expectedException docblock annotation.

/**
 * @expectedException ExceptionOne
 */
public function testFirstException() {
    $fixture->firstFunction();
}

If you want to keep the try/catch approach, the same applies: make sure that the only line in the try block is the line which should throw the exception.

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1  
Additionally if you use the try/catch approach and are using PHPUnit 3.6 or higher, you should use assertInstanceOf instead of assertType. This is per the phpunit documentation itself as assertType is deprecated. –  D-Rock Nov 2 '12 at 15:48
    
As I said, I really shouldn't change the test file here... But I'll try to do this and see what will happen... –  errata Nov 2 '12 at 15:49
    
Hmm... So, in both try blocks in testing functions there are 2 lines: one is calling the method from my class, the other one is $this->assertTrue(false, "Some message");. If I delete the second one from testSecondException, everything works as expected... Still, I think I really shouldn't change the code in testing file for few different reasons... Is there anything else I could try? How comes that testFirstException works fine with 2 lines of code in try block? :/ –  errata Nov 2 '12 at 15:58
    
You need to fix your tests. A failed assertion is marked as such by throwing an exception. In that case, you shouldn't catch generic exceptions. How come you don't want to change your tests? The try/catch approach is causing you a problem. At the very least, update to be like the PHPunit example (i.e. don't catch generic exceptions, and don't do assertTrue(false))! –  cmbuckley Nov 2 '12 at 16:02
    
I see... Well, thanks a lot for helping! Regarding changing the test itself... I got a task to write that class and to test it with PHPUnit which was already written for me... Nowhere in the task description is stated that "there's something wrong in testing code" so I suppose I shouldn't touch it :) –  errata Nov 2 '12 at 16:08

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