Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can I add more than one validator to an object? For example:

public interface IFoo
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    string Name { get; set; }
}

public interface IBar
{
    string Stuff { get; set; }
}

public class FooValidator : AbstractValidator<IFoo>
{
    public FooValidator ()
    {
        RuleFor(x => x.Id).NotEmpty().GreaterThan(0);
    }
}

public class BarValidator : AbstractValidator<IBar>
{
    public BarValidator()
    {
        RuleFor(x => x.Stuff).Length(5, 30);
    }
}

public class FooBar : IFoo, IBar
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Stuff { get; set; }
}

public class FooBarValidator : AbstractValidator<FooBar>
{
    public FooBarValidator()
    {
        RuleFor(x => x)
            .SetValidator(new FooValidator())
            .SetValidator(new BarValidator());
    }
}

Running the test.

FooBarValidator validator = new FooBarValidator();
validator.ShouldHaveValidationErrorFor(x => x.Id, 0);

I get an InvalidOperationException Message: Property name could not be automatically determined for expression x => x. Please specify either a custom property name by calling 'WithName'.

Is there any way to implement this or am I trying to use FluentValidation in a way that it's not meant to be used?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

RuleFor is trying to create a property-level rule. You can additionally use the AddRule function to add a general-purpose rule.

Using this, I created a composite rule proof of concept. It takes in a set of other validators and runs them. The yield break code came straight from FluentValidator's DelegateValidator. I wasn't sure what to do with it so I grabbed that from the source. I didn't trace its full purpose, but everything seems to work as is :)

Code

public interface IFoo
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    string Name { get; set; }
}

public interface IBar
{
    string Stuff { get; set; }
}

public class FooValidator : AbstractValidator<IFoo>
{
    public FooValidator()
    {
        RuleFor(x => x.Id).NotEmpty().GreaterThan(0);
    }
}

public class BarValidator : AbstractValidator<IBar>
{
    public BarValidator()
    {
        RuleFor(x => x.Stuff).Length(5, 30);
    }
}

public class FooBar : IFoo, IBar
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Stuff { get; set; }
}

public class CompositeValidatorRule : IValidationRule
{
    private IValidator[] _validators;

    public CompositeValidatorRule(params IValidator[] validators)
    {
        _validators = validators;
    }

    #region IValidationRule Members
    public string RuleSet
    {
        get; set;
    }

    public IEnumerable<ServiceStack.FluentValidation.Results.ValidationFailure> Validate(ValidationContext context)
    {
        var ret = new List<ServiceStack.FluentValidation.Results.ValidationFailure>();

        foreach(var v in _validators)
        {
            ret.AddRange(v.Validate(context).Errors);
        }

        return ret;
    }

    public IEnumerable<ServiceStack.FluentValidation.Validators.IPropertyValidator> Validators
    {
        get { yield break; }
    }
    #endregion
}

public class FooBarValidator : AbstractValidator<FooBar>
{
    public FooBarValidator()
    {
        AddRule(new CompositeValidatorRule(new FooValidator(), new BarValidator()));
    }
}

Base Test Case:

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestValidator()
    {
        FooBarValidator validator = new FooBarValidator();
        var result = validator.Validate(new FooBar());

    }

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
With a little bit of reflection, you could auto-find all validators that a composite validator should wire up to (i.e. find all the interfaces and base class chains and see if there's an IValidator<T> for them and if so auto-add it to the list). Just depends how far you want to take it. I'd probably opt to use reflection to find all the validators instead of a manual list. –  Eli Gassert Nov 2 '12 at 18:06

You could use RuleSets to apply different types of validation if that helps with what you are trying to do:

FluentValidation RuleSets

share|improve this answer
    
RuleSets wont fit. I would always like to run all of the validation rules. I'm trying to build up DTO's that have a lot of the same properties so it would be nice to reuse the validators without having nested obj properties in the DTO. –  Bjarki Heiðar Nov 2 '12 at 15:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.