Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is it possible, in PHP, to flatten a (bi/multi)dimensional array without using recursion or references?

I'm only interested in the values so the keys can be ignored, I'm thinking in the lines of array_map() and array_values().

share|improve this question
11  
Why avoid recursion? – JorenB Aug 23 '09 at 23:53
5  
Dupe (mostly) stackoverflow.com/questions/526556/… – cletus Aug 23 '09 at 23:53
4  
You can't do anything with all elements of an arbitrarily deep arrays without recursion (you can disguise it as iteration, but potato, potahto.) If you just want to avoid writing the recursion handling code yourself, use dk2.php.net/manual/en/function.array-walk-recursive.php with a callback that adds the element to an available array (use global, the userdata parameter, put it all in a class and refer to $this, etc.) – Michael Madsen Aug 24 '09 at 0:05
    
@JorenB: I would like to see a implementation could be archived. – Alix Axel Aug 24 '09 at 1:42

18 Answers 18

up vote 126 down vote accepted

You can use the Standard PHP Library (SPL) to "hide" the recursion.

$a = array(1,2,array(3,4, array(5,6,7), 8), 9);
$it = new RecursiveIteratorIterator(new RecursiveArrayIterator($a));
foreach($it as $v) {
  echo $v, " ";
}

prints

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
share|improve this answer
170  
Am I the only one that thinks 'RecursiveIteratorIterator' is a silly name? – nilamo Aug 24 '09 at 6:51
21  
It's more "logical" than "catchy". Not everything can have a fantastic name like JOGL, Knol or Azure :-) – VolkerK Aug 24 '09 at 8:35
4  
This won't work for empty arrays as children. They will be returned as a parent. – hakre Oct 22 '11 at 15:30
18  
iterator_to_array($it, false) avoids the need for the foreach. – Alix Axel Feb 20 '13 at 14:17
2  
@AlixAxel: As your example shows, the empty leafnodes are not offered. They could qualify as values (in array_values they would). Take care that it has a lot to do with what one expects / needs here. – hakre Feb 20 '13 at 16:18

As of PHP 5.3 the shortest solution seems to be array_walk_recursive() with the new closures syntax:

function flatten(array $array) {
    $return = array();
    array_walk_recursive($array, function($a) use (&$return) { $return[] = $a; });
    return $return;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
That's a nice solution! – Alix Axel Aug 24 '09 at 2:03
21  
if you want keys,function flatten(array $array) { $return = array(); array_walk_recursive($array, function($a,$b) use (&$return) { $return[$b] = $a; }); return $return; } – Brendon-Van-Heyzen Jul 5 '11 at 16:40
1  
@Alex unfortunately you need the use syntax to make this work with array_walk_recursive since it won't accept the optional $userdata parameter by reference – Tim Seguine Feb 4 '14 at 9:14
1  
Look like works fine for such Arrays -> ideone.com/DsmApP But not for such ones -> ideone.com/5Kltva Or is it me? – Sebastian Piskorski Sep 19 '14 at 10:23
1  
@Sebastian Piskorski it's because your values are being treated like keys, so as soon as you introduce your own key=>value pair in an array, your array values in the first index position are treated like keys with no values, and because keys have to be unique, where two keys match, your values get added to the same key. A simple solution would be to sort the array first. This is behaviour inherent in PHP. – Martyn Shutt Sep 19 '15 at 13:28

Solution for 2 dimensional array

Please try this :

$array  = your array

$result = call_user_func_array('array_merge', $array);

echo "<pre>";
print_r($result);

EDIT : 21-Aug-13

Here is the solution which works for multi-dimensional array :

function array_flatten($array) {
    $return = array();
    foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
        if (is_array($value)){
            $return = array_merge($return, array_flatten($value));
        } else {
            $return[$key] = $value;
        }
    }

    return $return;
}

$array  = Your array

$result = array_flatten($array);

echo "<pre>";
print_r($result);

Ref: http://php.net/manual/en/function.call-user-func-array.php

share|improve this answer
    
It fails: codepad.org/IoGmYF4U. – Alix Axel Feb 20 '13 at 13:26
    
Yes, it will work only for bi-dimensional array – Prasanth Bendra Feb 20 '13 at 13:30
    
Thank you, the first one worked on an array I was getting from PDO where the other solutions did not. – JAL Nov 30 '13 at 23:04
1  
This is a poor strategy. call_user_func_array('array_merge', []) (notice the empty array) returns null and triggers a php warning error. It's a slick solution if you know for a fact your array won't be empty, but that's not a common assumption many can make. – goat Jan 15 '15 at 6:42

To flatten w/o recursion (as you have asked for), you can use a stack. Naturally you can put this into a function of it's own like array_flatten. The following is a version that works w/o keys:.

function array_flatten(array $array)
{
    $flat = array(); // initialize return array
    $stack = array_values($array); // initialize stack
    while($stack) // process stack until done
    {
        $value = array_shift($stack);
        if (is_array($value)) // a value to further process
        {
            $stack = array_merge(array_values($value), $stack);
        }
        else // a value to take
        {
           $flat[] = $value;
        }
    }
    return $flat;
}

Elements are processed in their order. Because subelements will be moved on top of the stack, they will be processed next.

It's possible to take keys into account as well, however, you'll need a different strategy to handle the stack. That's needed because you need to deal with possible duplicate keys in the sub-arrays. A similar answer in a related question: PHP Walk through multidimensional array while preserving keys

I'm not specifically sure, but I I had tested this in the past: The RecurisiveIterator does use recursion, so it depends on what you really need. Should be possible to create a recursive iterator based on stacks as well:

foreach(new FlatRecursiveArrayIterator($array) as $key => $value)
{
    echo "** ($key) $value\n";
}

Demo

I didn't make it so far, to implement the stack based on RecursiveIterator which I think is a nice idea.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 FlatRecursiveArrayIterator almost thinking it existed officially – Baba Oct 13 '12 at 21:44
1  
+1 for actually answering the question without recursion or methods which use recursion. – Twifty Jun 12 '14 at 18:48
    
This is the only answer that actually answers the question... (not using recursion at all) – Polygnome Sep 3 '15 at 18:38

Uses recursion. Hopefully upon seeing how not-complex it is, your fear of recursion will dissipate once you see how not-complex it is.

function flatten($array) {
    if (!is_array($array)) {
        // nothing to do if it's not an array
        return array($array);
    }

    $result = array();
    foreach ($array as $value) {
        // explode the sub-array, and add the parts
        $result = array_merge($result, flatten($value));
    }

    return $result;
}


$arr = array('foo', array('nobody', 'expects', array('another', 'level'), 'the', 'Spanish', 'Inquisition'), 'bar');
echo '<ul>';
foreach (flatten($arr) as $value) {
    echo '<li>', $value, '</li>';
}
echo '<ul>';

Output:

<ul><li>foo</li><li>nobody</li><li>expects</li><li>another</li><li>level</li><li>the</li><li>Spanish</li><li>Inquisition</li><li>bar</li><ul>
share|improve this answer
    
I don't fear recursion, I just want to learn other ways to do the same. – Alix Axel Aug 24 '09 at 2:02
9  
+1 for this recursion: Hopefully upon seeing how not-complex it is, your fear of recursion will dissipate once you see how not-complex it is. – Tiberiu-Ionuț Stan Feb 5 '13 at 15:35
    
OK, this is over me. How it is possible, that reply ("I don't fear recursion") is three and a half year older (Aug 24 '09) than initial statement ("(...) your fear of recursion will dissipate (...)"), made on Feb 5 '13? – trejder Jun 20 '13 at 10:52
1  
@trejder: My reply was to the answer. I'm scared of recursion now! – Alix Axel Jul 19 '13 at 20:50

Just thought I'd point out that this is a fold, so array_reduce can be used:

array_reduce($my_array, 'array_merge', array());

EDIT: Note that this can be composed to flatten any number of levels. We can do this in several ways:

// Reduces one level
$concat   = function($x) { return array_reduce($x, 'array_merge', array()); };

// We can compose $concat with itself $n times, then apply it to $x
// This can overflow the stack for large $n
$compose  = function($f, $g) {
    return function($x) use ($f, $g) { return $f($g($x)); };
};
$identity = function($x) { return $x; };
$flattenA = function($n) use ($compose, $identity, $concat) {
    return  function($x) use ($compose, $identity, $concat, $n) {
        return ($n === 0)? $x
                         : call_user_func(array_reduce(array_fill(0, $n, $concat),
                                                       $compose,
                                                       $identity),
                                          $x);
    };
};

// We can iteratively apply $concat to $x, $n times
$uncurriedFlip     = function($f) {
    return  function($a, $b) use ($f) {
        return $f($b, $a);
    };
};
$iterate  = function($f) use ($uncurriedFlip) {
    return  function($n) use ($uncurriedFlip, $f) {
    return  function($x) use ($uncurriedFlip, $f, $n) {
        return ($n === 0)? $x
                         : array_reduce(array_fill(0, $n, $f),
                                        $uncurriedFlip('call_user_func'),
                                        $x);
    }; };
};
$flattenB = $iterate($concat);

// Example usage:
$apply    = function($f, $x) {
    return $f($x);
};
$curriedFlip = function($f) {
    return  function($a) use ($f) {
    return  function($b) use ($f, $a) {
        return $f($b, $a);
    }; };
};

var_dump(
    array_map(
        call_user_func($curriedFlip($apply),
                       array(array(array('A', 'B', 'C'),
                                   array('D')),
                             array(array(),
                                   array('E')))),
        array($flattenA(2), $flattenB(2))));

Of course, we could also use loops but the question asks for a combinator function along the lines of array_map or array_values.

share|improve this answer
    
Multi-dimensional != bi-dimensional. – Alix Axel Jul 17 '13 at 17:29
    
this doesn't work: php.net/manual/en/function.array-reduce.php#90015 – atamur Jul 17 '13 at 19:53
    
@atamur This works on PHP 5.3+. As noted in the changelog for array_reduce, $initial could only be an integer before 5.3, then it was allowed to be "mixed" (ie. anything your reduction function supports) – Warbo Jul 19 '13 at 13:20
1  
@AlixAxel You're right that multi-dimensional != bi-dimensional, but this can be composed to flatten any number of levels. One nice consequence of composing folds is that it obeys a fixed limit; if I have an array nested to 5 levels, I can fold it into 4 levels, or fold . fold it to get 3 levels, or fold . fold . fold it to get 2 levels, etc. This also prevents bugs getting hidden; eg. if I want to flatten a 5D array but I'm given a 4D array, the error will trigger immediately. – Warbo Jul 19 '13 at 13:35

The trick is passing the both the source and destination arrays by reference.

function flatten_array(&$arr, &$dst) {
    if(!isset($dst) || !is_array($dst)) {
        $dst = array();
    }
    if(!is_array($arr)) {
        $dst[] = $arr;
    } else {
        foreach($arr as &$subject) {
            flatten_array($subject, $dst);
        }
    }
}

$recursive = array('1', array('2','3',array('4',array('5','6')),'7',array(array(array('8'),'9'),'10')));
echo "Recursive: \r\n";
print_r($recursive);
$flat = null;
flatten_array($recursive, $flat);

echo "Flat: \r\n";
print_r($flat);

// If you change line 3 to $dst[] = &$arr; , you won't waste memory,
// since all you're doing is copying references, and imploding the array 
// into a string will be both memory efficient and fast:)

echo "String:\r\n";
echo implode(',',$flat);
share|improve this answer

This solution is non-recursive. Note that the order of the elements will be somewhat mixed.

function flatten($array) {
    $return = array();
    while(count($array)) {
        $value = array_shift($array);
        if(is_array($value))
            foreach($value as $sub)
                $array[] = $sub;
        else
            $return[] = $value;
    }
    return $return;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Clever idea, but there's a bug. "$array[] = $value" doesn't add all the elements of $value to $array, it merely add $value itself. If you run this code, it will loop indefinitely. – Todd Owen Aug 24 '09 at 0:29
    
Yes, shifting the value off the array and appending it again to the end doesn't make much sense. I guess you wanted to array_merge() instead? – deceze Aug 24 '09 at 0:37
    
+1 for answering the question. Recursion would be more fun, though. – nilamo Aug 24 '09 at 1:23

For php 5.2

function flatten(array $array) {
    $result = array();

    if (is_array($array)) {
        foreach ($array as $k => $v) {
            if (is_array($v)) {
                $result = array_merge($result, flatten($v));
            } else {
                $result[] = $v;
            }
        }
    }

    return $result;
}
share|improve this answer

You can do it with ouzo goodies:

 $result = Arrays::flatten($multidimensional);

See: http://ouzo.readthedocs.org/en/latest/utils/arrays.html#flatten

share|improve this answer

Because the code in here looks scary. Here is a function that will also convert a multidimensional array into html form compatible syntax, but which is easier to read.

/**
 * Flattens a multi demensional array into a one dimensional
 * to be compatible with hidden html fields.
 *
 * @param array $array
 *  Array in the form:
 *  array(
 *    'a' => array(
 *      'b' => '1'
 *    )
 *  )
 *
 * @return array
 *  Array in the form:
 *  array(
 *    'a[b]' => 1,
 *  )
 */
function flatten_array($array) {
  // Continue until $array is a one-dimensional array.
  $continue = TRUE;
  while ($continue) {
    $continue = FALSE;

    // Walk through top and second level of $array and move 
    // all values in the second level up one level.
    foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
      if (is_array($value)) {
        // Second level found, therefore continue.
        $continue = TRUE;

        // Move each value a level up.
        foreach ($value as $child_key => $child_value) {
          $array[$key . '[' . $child_key . ']'] = $child_value;
        }

        // Remove second level array from top level.
        unset($array[$key]);
      }
    }
  }

  return $array;
}
share|improve this answer

This version can do deep, shallow, or a specific number of levels:

/**
 * @param  array|object $array  array of mixed values to flatten
 * @param  int|boolean  $level  0:deep, 1:shallow, 2:2 levels, 3...
 * @return array
 */
function flatten($array, $level = 0) {
    $level = (int) $level;
    $result = array();
    foreach ($array as $i => $v) {
        if (0 <= $level && is_array($v)) {
            $v = flatten($v, $level > 1 ? $level - 1 : 0 - $level);
            $result = array_merge($result, $v);
        } elseif (is_int($i)) {
            $result[] = $v;
        } else {
            $result[$i] = $v; 
        }
    }
    return $result;
}
share|improve this answer
/**
 * For merging values of a multidimensional array into one 
 *
 * $array = [
 *     0 => [
 *         0 => 'a1',
 *         1 => 'b1',
 *         2 => 'c1',
 *         3 => 'd1'
 *     ],
 *     1 => [
 *         0 => 'a2',
 *         1 => 'b2',
 *         2 => 'c2',
 *     ]
 * ];
 *
 * becomes : 
 *
 * $array = [
 *     0 => 'a1',
 *     1 => 'b1',
 *     2 => 'c1',
 *     3 => 'd1',
 *     4 => 'a2',
 *     5 => 'b2',
 *     6 => 'c2',
 *     
 * ]
 */
array_reduce
(
    $multiArray
    , function ($lastItem, $currentItem) {
        $lastItem = $lastItem ?: array();
        return array_merge($lastItem, array_values($currentItem));
    }
);

Gist snippet

share|improve this answer
    
This seems to only support bi-dimensional arrays. – Alix Axel Aug 26 '13 at 12:18
    
You are right. There is no point to use it. I think the best solution is "too much php"'s answer. – Arsham Aug 26 '13 at 15:46

This is my solution, using a reference:

function arrayFlatten($array_in, &$array_out){

    if(is_array($array_in)){
        foreach ($array_in as $element){
               arrayFlatten($element, $array_out);
        }
    }
    else{
        $array_out[] = $array_in; 
    }
}

$arr1 = array('1', '2', array(array(array('3'), '4', '5')), array(array('6')));

arrayFlatten($arr1, $arr2);

echo "<pre>";
print_r($arr2);
echo "</pre>";
share|improve this answer

Try the following simple function:

function _flatten_array($arr) {
  while ($arr) {
    list($key, $value) = each($arr); 
    is_array($value) ? $arr = $value : $out[$key] = $value;
    unset($arr[$key]);
  }
  return (array)$out;
}

So from this:

array (
  'und' => 
  array (
    'profiles' => 
    array (
      0 => 
      array (
        'commerce_customer_address' => 
        array (
          'und' => 
          array (
            0 => 
            array (
              'first_name' => 'First name',
              'last_name' => 'Last name',
              'thoroughfare' => 'Address 1',
              'premise' => 'Address 2',
              'locality' => 'Town/City',
              'administrative_area' => 'County',
              'postal_code' => 'Postcode',
            ),
          ),
        ),
      ),
    ),
  ),
)

you get:

array (
  'first_name' => 'First name',
  'last_name' => 'Last name',
  'thoroughfare' => 'Address 1',
  'premise' => 'Address 2',
  'locality' => 'Town/City',
  'administrative_area' => 'County',
  'postal_code' => 'Postcode',
)
share|improve this answer

A straightforward answer.

function flatten_array(array $array)
{
    return iterator_to_array(
         new \RecursiveIteratorIterator(new \RecursiveArrayIterator($array)));
}

Usage:

$array = [
    'name' => 'Allen Linatoc',
    'profile' => [
        'age' => 21,
        'favourite_games' => [ 'Call of Duty', 'Titanfall', 'Far Cry' ]
    ]
];

print_r( flatten_array($array) );

Output:

Array
(
    [name] => Allen Linatoc
    [age] => 21
    [0] => Call of Duty
    [1] => Titanfall
    [2] => Far Cry
)

Now it's pretty up to you now how you'll handle the keys. Cheers

share|improve this answer

I needed to represent PHP multidimensional array in HTML input format.

$test = [
    'a' => [
        'b' => [
            'c' => ['a', 'b']
        ]
    ],
    'b' => 'c',
    'c' => [
        'd' => 'e'
    ]
];

$flatten = function ($input, $parent = []) use (&$flatten) {
    $return = [];

    foreach ($input as $k => $v) {
        if (is_array($v)) {
            $return = array_merge($return, $flatten($v, array_merge($parent, [$k])));
        } else {
            if ($parent) {
                $key = implode('][', $parent) . '][' . $k . ']';

                if (substr_count($key, ']') != substr_count($key, '[')) {
                    $key = preg_replace('/\]/', '', $key, 1);
                }
            } else {
                $key = $k;
            }           

            $return[$key] = $v;
        }
    }

    return $return;
};

die(var_dump( $flatten($test) ));

array(4) {
  ["a[b][c][0]"]=>
  string(1) "a"
  ["a[b][c][1]"]=>
  string(1) "b"
  ["b"]=>
  string(1) "c"
  ["c[d]"]=>
  string(1) "e"
}
share|improve this answer
    
    
@AlixAxel How is this comment relative? Wrong post.. ? – Gajus Kuizinas Sep 30 '13 at 9:52
    
No. I thought it was pretty similar to what you are doing and decided to share it, I think the only difference is that my representation is valid PHP as well - of the form $var['a']['b']['c'][0] = 'a'; .... – Alix Axel Sep 30 '13 at 12:00
    
I intentionally needed HTML output. Though thank you for sharing. – Gajus Kuizinas Sep 30 '13 at 12:52
    
This looks scary. – Gellweiler May 26 '15 at 16:20

If you have an array of objects and want to flatten it with a node, just use this function:

function objectArray_flatten($array,$childField) {
    $result = array();
    foreach ($array as $node)
    {
        $result[] = $node;
        if(isset($node->$childField))
        {
            $result = array_merge(
                $result, 
                objectArray_flatten($node->$childField,$childField)
            );
            unset($node->$childField);
        }

    }
    return $result;
}
share|improve this answer

protected by Madara Uchiha May 8 '14 at 20:36

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.