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The problem consists in minimizing the amount of coins required to give the exact change. There will always be coins of 1 available, therefore the problem will always have a solution.

Some sample coin sets with their solutions for an amount of 40 cents:

coin set = {1, 5, 10, 20, 25}, solution = {0, 0, 0, 2, 0}

coin set = {1, 5, 10, 20}, solution = {0, 0, 0, 2}

The implementation returns the correct min. number of coins, but I am having trouble preserving the right solution array.

int change(int amount, int n, const int* coins, int* solution) {
    if(amount > 0) {
        int numCoinsMin = numeric_limits<int>::max();
        int numCoins;
        int imin;
        for(int i = 0; i != n; ++i) {
            if(amount >= coins[i]) {
                numCoins =  change(amount - coins[i], n, coins, solution) + 1;
                if(numCoins < numCoinsMin) {
                    numCoinsMin = numCoins;
                    imin = i;
                }   
            }   
        }   
        solution[imin] += 1;
        return numCoinsMin;
    }   
    return 0;
}

Sample run:

int main() {
    const int n = 4;
    int coins[n] = {1, 5, 10, 20, 25};
    int solution[n] = {0, 0, 0, 0, 0};
    int amount = 40;

    int min = change(amount, n, coins, solution);
    cout << "Min: " << min << endl;
    print(coins, coins+n); // 1, 5, 10, 20
    print(solution, solution+n); // 231479, 20857, 4296, 199
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
could you be a little more specific about what you want to have happen? I'm not sure what you mean by 'preserving the right solution array' –  Josh Bibb Nov 2 '12 at 16:15
    
Updated the question with a sample run. For example, when i run it for 40, the solution array should be 0, 0, 0, 2. Denoting that only 2 coins of 20 cents are needed. But i get those big numbers instead. –  blaze Nov 2 '12 at 16:19
    
Does this problem require anything besides recursion? Like do you have to use arrays? The reason I ask is that I'm not sure I would do it this way unless youre being forced to use arrays for some reason –  Josh Bibb Nov 2 '12 at 16:26
    
No, I am not forced to use arrays. –  blaze Nov 2 '12 at 16:28
    
I updated my answer, it now solves the problem. –  burninggramma Nov 10 '12 at 16:25

2 Answers 2

You can still do this using arrays, but I'd alter the structure of the program to make it a little bit cleaner to recurse.

I'm gonna have to pseudocode this for you because I dont use C++ hardly at all but you can probably put it together. This makes use of modulo division (% in C#, dunno if its the same in C++, you can look it up) which returns ONLY the remainder of a division. And normal division (/) in most programming languages, will return the whole number answer and ignore any remainders.

//declare a function that takes in your change amount and the length of your coins array
int changeCounter(int amount, int coins.length)
      int index = coins.length-1;

      //check to see if we're done... again dunno what 'or' is in C++, I put ||

      if (amount <= 0 || index < 0)
         **return** your results array or whatever you want to do here

      //sees how many of the biggest coin there are and puts that number in the results
      if amount > coins[index]
      {
        result[index]= (amount / coins[index])
        //now recurse with the left over coins and drop to the next biggest coin
        changeCounter((amount % coins[index]), index-1)
      }

      //if the amount isnt greater than the coin size then there obviously arent any of that size, so just drop coin sizes and recurse again
      else
         changeCounter(amount,index-1)

This should get you started down the right direction, I tried to comment it for you and I'm sorry I cant put it in perfect C++ syntax for you but it shouldnt be too hard to translate what i did here into what you're trying to do.

If you have any questions let me know

share|improve this answer
    
I just tried to comment this but idk where the heck it went lol. If you still need to find the minimum number of total coins, just loop through the finished results array and add the values. Or you can just keep a variable inside the function that adds the result value to it when its doing the math –  Josh Bibb Nov 2 '12 at 16:57
    
I have one question: isn't this a greedy approach? For example, if my coin set is {1, 5, 10, 20, 25} and the amount is 40. It will pick, 1 of 25, then it will pick 1 of 20 and then 1 of 5. Instead of 2 of 20. –  blaze Nov 2 '12 at 17:07
    
I didnt realize that you wanted to minimize the overall number of coins you got, I just thought you wanted to efficiently make change. That makes this more complicated than I can spend time answering it while on my lunch break. Will look again when I get home if it isnt answered by then. –  Josh Bibb Nov 2 '12 at 17:44

First the question was not clear enough about using greedy or coin count minimizing solution, so in this post you can see both solutions. In the second solution I've used some c++ stl features but since the question was tagged c++, I think its allright. BTW see the main function at the end its a bit changed.

========== Greedy ( no minimization on coin count ) =============

I'm not sure why do U use such a complicated algorithm. First I tried to debug your solution, what You should still DO, to see where you doing wrong. DDD is a nice and simple GUI debugger tool. Here is a simple solution however:

int change(int amount, int n, const int* coins, int* solution){
  int inc_on_position = 0,
      result = 0;
  while(n){
    inc_on_position = amount / coins[n-1];
    amount         -= inc_on_position * coins[n-1];
    solution[n-1]   = inc_on_position;
    result         += inc_on_position;
    n--;
  }
  return result;
}

=========== Solution minimized on necessary coin count ============

I liked this question, I will do a blog post about it.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>

class Changer{
  private:
    std::vector<int> coins_;
    std::map< int,std::vector<int> > solutions_;
    int amount_;

    std::vector<int> change( bool use_max, int max_pos, int max_val ){
      std::vector<int> result(coins_.size(),0);
      int rest = amount_,
          act_val = 0;
      if(!use_max){
        max_pos = coins_.size() - 1;
        max_val = rest / coins_[max_pos];
      }
      result[max_pos] = max_val;
      rest -= result[max_pos] * coins_[max_pos];
      while(max_pos){
        result[max_pos-1] = rest / coins_[max_pos-1];
        rest -= result[max_pos-1] * coins_[max_pos-1];
        max_pos--;
      }
      return result;

    }
  public:
    Changer( std::vector<int> & coins, int amount ) : 
      coins_(coins), 
      amount_(amount){};

    void run(){
      bool cont = true, use_max = false;
      int max_pos = 0, max_val = 0, act_count = 0;
      while(cont){
        act_count = 0;
        std::vector<int> tmp = change(use_max, max_pos, max_val);
        for( int ind = 0; ind != tmp.size(); ind++){ 
          if(tmp[ind] > 0){ max_pos = ind; act_count += tmp[ind]; }
        }
        max_val = tmp[max_pos] - 1;
        cont = max_pos > 0;
        use_max = true;
        solutions_[act_count] = tmp;
      }
    }

    int min_count(){ return solutions_.begin()->first; }

    std::string info(){
      std::stringstream tmp;
      for( int i = 0; i != solutions_.begin()->second.size(); i++){
        tmp << std::endl << "   # from: " << coins_[i] << "(er) "
          << solutions_.begin()->second[i] << " piece(s) "; 
      }
      return tmp.str();
    }

};

int main(int argc, char** argv){
  int coins[] = {1,5,10,20,25};
  std::vector<int> coins_vector (coins, coins + sizeof(coins) / sizeof(int) );
  Changer changer(coins_vector, 40);
  changer.run();
  std::cout << " # Min count of coins needed: " 
    << changer.min_count() << std::endl;
  std::cout << " # Used coin counts: " 
    << changer.info() << std::endl;
}

OUTPUT:

 # Min count of coins needed: 2
 # Used coin counts: 
   # from: 1(er) 0 piece(s) 
   # from: 5(er) 0 piece(s) 
   # from: 10(er) 0 piece(s) 
   # from: 20(er) 2 piece(s) 
   # from: 25(er) 0 piece(s)
share|improve this answer
    
isn't this a greedy approach? For example, if my coin set is {1, 5, 10, 20, 25} and the amount is 40. It will pick, 1 of 25, then it will pick 1 of 20 and then 1 of 5. Instead of 2 of 20. –  blaze Nov 2 '12 at 17:25
    
Ye, it does ( if you meant 1 of 25, 1 of 10, 1 of 5 ), you didn't really wrote what your code should do, and it's not really that selfexplaining. Do You want to minimize on change coins count? –  burninggramma Nov 2 '12 at 17:27
    
Yes, sorry for not stating it clearly. Will update the question. –  blaze Nov 2 '12 at 17:30
    
Updated my answer accordingly. –  burninggramma Nov 2 '12 at 18:58

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