Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to use Javascript / JQuery to dynamically create several HTML buttons, each of which does something different when it is clicked.

My first attempt looked like this:

function myFunc( target_div, num_buttons ) {
    var buttons="";
    for ( var i=0; i<num_buttons; i++ ) {
        buttons += '<input type="button" id="button_'+i+'" value="button_'+i+'"></input>';
    }
    target_div.html( buttons );
    var doButtonPress = function( i ) {
        alert( i ); // I actually do something more complicated here, but it's not important now
    }
    for ( var i=0; i<num_buttons; i++ ) {
        $('#button_'+i).click( function() { doButtonPress(i); } );
    }
}

Unfortunately this doesn't work because (I think) when the click event happens, doButtonPress is always passed the current value of i in myFunc's scope, not - as I intended - the value i had when the click event was defined. Thus the value passed to doButtonPress is always equal to num_buttons regardless of which button is pressed. So I then tried this instead:

$('#button_'+i).click( new Function( "doButtonPress("+i+");" ) );

Unfortunately this doesn't work either - I get a message "ReferenceError: Can't find variable: returnResult". I assume that's because the Function constructor's arg value isn't parsed until the click event happens, and at that time I'm already outside of myFunc's scope so doButtonPress is undefined? Am I getting this right so far?

So ... what do I do? :-)

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code didn't work because of the scope of variable i which would be num_button always inside the handler. You can fix it by wrapping it inside a closure but how about simplifying it by adding a class and making use of the id of the button.

function myFunc( target_div, num_buttons ) {
    var buttons="";
    for ( var i=0; i<num_buttons; i++ ) {
        //                             added class ----------------v
        buttons += '<input type="button" id="button_'+i+'" class="mybuttons" value="button_'+i+'"></input>';
    }
    target_div.html( buttons );
    var doButtonPress = function( i ) {
        alert( i ); // I actually do something more complicated here, but it's not important now
    }

    //yes, mybuttons exist 
    $('.mybuttons').click(function () {
         doButtonPress(this.id.replace('button_', ''));
         //this.id.replace('button_', '') <- returns i value
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great - thanks! I like this solution because it allows doButtonPress to not know anything about the buttons, as intended. Although I guess I should change the name if that's what I intend! :) –  baixiwei Nov 2 '12 at 16:36
add comment

My suggestion would be to assign a data attribute to each button which can then be read when the button is clicked. This will then avoid the need for unnecessary (and ugly) incremental id attributes. Something like this:

function myFunc($target_div, num_buttons) {
    var buttons = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < num_buttons; i++) {
        buttons.push($('<input type="button" class="button" data-id="' + i + '" value="button ' + i + '" />'));
    }
    $target_div.append(buttons);

    var doButtonPress = function() {
        alert($(this).data('id'));
    }

    $(".button").click(doButtonPress);
}

Example fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, OK, so when doButtonPress is called, this will automatically refer to the button that was clicked to invoke it? Cool. Thanks! –  baixiwei Nov 2 '12 at 16:35
    
@baixiwei no problem. Don't forget to click the green tick to the left if this answer helped. –  Rory McCrossan Nov 2 '12 at 16:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.