Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a strange array that I need to sort in a certain way, and I'm not sure if it's doable without a lot of manual labor.

Consider the array: [ '1a', '2a', '2aa', '5-6', '1', '2', '3', '20' , '7', '8']

It's an array of strings. Sorted properly, it would look like:

[ '1', '1a', '2', '2a', '2aa', '3', '5-6', '7', '8', '20' ]

Think of it like an outline numbering system of sorts.

How can I sort in that order?

Here's a jsfiddle showing how a regular sort treats it with its default lexicographical behavior (it's actually pretty close to what it needs to be):

http://jsfiddle.net/qkE9m/

I am working in node.js and have underscore.js at my disposal.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, here's my attempt at solving this problem. The code is pretty verbose right now, but I'm looking at how to shrink it and will update my answer as I go. This should solve the problem enough to get you moving though. I'll be posting my code as a node module, since that's your env.

The gist of it is that it breaks the items down into separate parts that can be individually sorted. It loops each of those arrays in parallel, and once it finds a mismatch it will run a basic sort comparison.

sorter.js

// regex patterns to determine how to "parse" an input item
var patterns = [
    /^([a-zA-Z]+)$/,                      // only letters
    /^(\d+)$/,                          // only contains an integer
    /^(\d+)\-\d+$/,                     // contains 2 integers separated by a hyphen
    /^(\d+)([a-z]+)?\-(\d+)([a-z]+)?$/, // contains a 2 integer/letter combos separated by a hyphen
    /^(\d+)([a-z]+)$/                   // contains an integer followed by letters
];

function itemComparator(item) {
    var len = patterns.length,
        matches, x, regex;

    for (x = 0; x < len; x++) {
        regex = patterns[x];
        if (regex.test(item)) {
            matches = item.match(regex).slice(1);
            if (/^\d+$/.test(matches[0])) {
                matches[0] = parseInt(matches[0], 10);
            }
            return matches;
        }
    }

    throw new Error("could not parse item for comparison: " + item);
}

module.exports = function (a, b) {
    var compA = itemComparator(a),
        compB = itemComparator(b),
        x, len, tmpA, tmpB, typeA, typeB; // tmp vars

    // find the largest size, so we don't miss anything
    len = Math.max(compA.length, compB.length);

    // loop each comp arr in parallel
    for (x = 0; x < len; x += 1) {
        // store for speed
        tmpA = compA[x];
        tmpB = compB[x];
        typeA = typeof tmpA;
        typeB = typeof tmpB;

        // if the elements are not equal
        if (tmpA !== tmpB) {
            // then do the comparison, and stop the loop
            if (typeA === typeB) {
                return tmpA < tmpB ? -1 : 1;
            } else if (typeA === "undefined") {
                return -1;
            } else if (typeB === "undefined") {
                return 1;
            } else if (typeA === "string") {
                return -1;
            } else if (typeB === "string") {
                return 1;
            } else {
                console.warn("unexpected condition for %s (%s) and %s (%s)", tmpA, typeA, tmpB, typeB);
                return 0;
            }
        }
    }
};

test.js

var sorter = require("./sorter"),
    arr = [
        '1a', 'aa', '2a', '2aa', '5-6', '1', '2', '3', 'DBA', 'bb',
        '20', '2b', '7', '8', '125a', '33a-35', 'ABC',
        '3aaa-4c', '3aaa-52d', 'AA', 'c', '5dd', 'aa'
    ];

console.log(arr.sort(sorter));

// [ 'AA',
//   'ABC',
//   'DBA',
//   'aa',
//   'aa',
//   'bb',
//   'c',
//   '1',
//   '1a',
//   '2',
//   '2a',
//   '2aa',
//   '2b',
//   '3',
//   '3aaa-4c',
//   '3aaa-52d',
//   '5-6',
//   '5dd',
//   '7',
//   '8',
//   '20',
//   '33a-35',
//   '125a' ]
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thanks a bunch. This is good stuff. I was able to "break" it by adding the string 20a to the mix. I think it's a problem with the 3rd regex. Should allow for any integer followed by any length of letters. Like 125, 125a, 125aa, 125aaa, 125b, 125bb should all be valid (and in that order). –  k00k Nov 2 '12 at 17:44
    
I changed that 3rd regex to: /^(\d{1,9}[a-z]+)$/ and that seems to work (up to 9 digit ints). I'm also thinking I need to catch ranges like: 33a-35 or 3aaa-4c –  k00k Nov 2 '12 at 17:51
    
I solved my last problem of int/str combo ranges like 3aaa-52d by adding another regex of: /^(\d{1,9}[a-z]+)\-\d{1,9}[a-z]+$/ –  k00k Nov 2 '12 at 18:07
    
I would just use + instead of {1,9}, much less verbose and accomplishes the same thing. Glad to hear you were able to extend this to your needs :) –  Dominic Barnes Nov 3 '12 at 15:33
    
Yeah, that's what I ended up doing. Thanks again! –  k00k Nov 4 '12 at 12:48

I don't know what your actual data looks like, but this should nudge you in the right direction, I think:

[ '1a', '2a', '2aa', '5-6', '1', '2', '3', '20' , '7', '8'].sort(function(a,b)
{
    if (parseFloat(a) !== parseFloat(b))
    {
        return parseFloat(a) - parseFloat(b);
    }
    if (a.charAt(0) !== b.charAt(0))
    {//just to be on the safe side
        return +(a[0]) - +(b[0]);
    }
    return a.length - b.length;
});
//result:
["1", "1a", "2", "2a", "2aa", "3", "5-6", "7", "8", "20"]
share|improve this answer
    
This is very close. The one thing that doesn't work, which is my fault for not including originally, are strings like: 2b which should come after 2aa in the above example. –  k00k Nov 2 '12 at 16:56
    
I've added a new JSfiddle working with this as a basis. You can see some of the other strings that are possible. 2a, 2aa, 2b, 2bb, 2bbb, 2c, 2cc, 2ccc would be a correct order. jsfiddle.net/q6a4P –  k00k Nov 2 '12 at 17:08
    
@k00k: Are those strings HEX numbers? in which case you could just convert them to ints, sort those, and then we can all carry on with out lives ;-P –  Elias Van Ootegem Nov 2 '12 at 19:53
    
Ha, no, they're just strings that represent some weird page numbering scheme. I think I'm all good though based on what Dominic provided and my regex tweaks. –  k00k Nov 2 '12 at 19:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.