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I have a static function in PHP:

public static function func( $foo, $bar ) {

}

where $bar is an integer. I want to implement a similar func but where $bar is a string. In C++ I would use overloading but the PHP documentation shows that overloading doesn't do the same as C++. Is there some other way I can achieve what I want?

One alterative that I thought about is some polymorphism but it seems kind of overkill?:

Make an interface with func defined (with no implementation) and just implement it in two different ways. So:

interface Something {
   public static function func( $foo, $bar );
}

class Something1 implements Something {
   public static function func( $foo, $bar ) {
      // some implementation
   }
}

class Something2 implements Something {
   public static function func( $foo, $bar ) {
      // some other implementation
   }
}

Many thanks.

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closed as not a real question by hakre, PeeHaa, SomeKittens Ux2666, NullPoiиteя, iMat Nov 3 '12 at 17:41

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
PHP does type convertion for you, if you want you can typecast some like return parent::func($foo, string $bar) Also in weakly typed languages types are implicitly polymorphic. –  boruch Nov 2 '12 at 16:39
    
PHP has no function signature based overloading. Get used to it. Also please do some search before asking: stackoverflow.com/search?q=%5Bphp%5D+method+overloading –  hakre Nov 3 '12 at 14:07
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3 Answers

Overloading in the sense of C++ or any other static typed language does not make sense in php, because you not need to make a type hint. That´s the nature of weakly typed languages and so it would not be a benefit in having this feature in php. You can pass any variable of any type to your function. In the case of objects you have polymorphism without having to use inheritance/interfaces to achieve polymoprhic behaviour. That´s called duck typing.

If you need different implementation for string/int, just check the type and provide the implementation in the same function.

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Something like this could help, you identify what type is $bar and then call the corresponding function.

public static function func( $foo, $bar ) {
   if (is_int($bar)) {
       self::funcBarInteger($foo, $bar);
   } else {
       self::funcBarString($foo, $bar);
   }
}

public static function funcBarInteger( $foo, $bar ) {

}

public static function funcBarString( $foo, $bar ) {

}
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1  
That's fine but not as slick being able to overload like in C++. –  ale Nov 2 '12 at 16:43
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Create one function, and depending on the type of that parameter, do different things or call the actual functions, func_int and funct_string. You're effectively doing the dispatch yourself.

For checking the type, there are gettype, and the is_.. functions.

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