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When considering something along the lines of

auto x = new T;

Does the Standard enforce that the memory must come from operator new- class-specific or global? i.e., there is no way a conforming implementation, given a lack of a class-specific operator new, could get the memory from anywhere except the global operator new?

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If you've used auto x, is that because T* x is potentially wrong, because T is potentially an array type? In which case, is the answer you're looking for that yes, it can come from an operator new[] instead of an operator new? I'll get me coat. –  Steve Jessop Nov 2 '12 at 17:17
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no, it's because I'm lazy. The type of T is irrelevant. –  Puppy Nov 2 '12 at 17:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think you have it the wrong way round.

The expression new T always consists of two steps:

  1. A suitable operator new is searched for. If one exists in the class T, that one is taken, otherwise the global one is taken. The global one always exists, as this is mandated by the standard (so you can never "define" it (since it is already defined), but you can replace it).

    You can say ::new T to always pick the global operator new unconditionally.

  2. Once the allocation function has been called and succeeded, the object is constructed in that memory.

If you say new (a, b, c) T, then the same happens, only that in step 1 we are now looking for an operator new overload with the appropriate signature.

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It is not guaranteed to be ::operator new, as the memory can come from a class specific operator new instead, but if no such class-specific version exists, then the global version will be used. The relevant part of the standard is [expr.new]/8:

A new-expression obtains storage for the object by calling an allocation function. ... the allocation function’s name is operator new ...

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So there is absolutely no way a conforming implementation could call anything other than global or class-specific operator new? –  Puppy Nov 2 '12 at 16:51
    
@DeadMG: It seems pretty clear to me: the storage is obtained from an allocation function, and the allocation function is operator new. –  Mankarse Nov 2 '12 at 16:59
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Yes, allocation/deallocation functions names are operator new/delete/[] only. Also note that you could override class-specific allocator with :: to enforce global allocator: auto x = ::new T; –  Rost Nov 2 '12 at 17:00

Does the Standard enforce that the memory must come from operator new- class-specific or global?

Yes, it does.

§5.3.4 [expr.new]:

p8 A new-expression obtains storage for the object by calling an allocation function (3.7.4.1). [...] If the allocated type is a non-array type, the allocation function’s name is operator new [...].

p9 If the new-expression begins with a unary :: operator, the allocation function’s name is looked up in the global scope. Otherwise, if the allocated type is a class type T or array thereof, the allocation function’s name is looked up in the scope of T. If this lookup fails to find the name, or if the allocated type is not a class type, the allocation function’s name is looked up in the global scope.

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