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I have two structs.

t_struct_inner {
  int a;
  ... // a lot more members
}

t_struct_outer {
  t_struct_inner[1000] inners;
  t_struct_outer* next;
}

I malloc t_struct_outer in my code. I want t_struct_inner to be cache aligned. My solution is to use

 __attribute__((aligned(
       ((sizeof(t_struct_inner)/CACHE_LINE_SIZE)+1) * CACHE_LINE_SIZE
)))

But obviously I cannot do this as I cannot use sizeof here. I do not want to hardcode a value for aligned. Any ideas how I can achieve the above?

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I cannot do this as I cannot use sizeof here why are you saying you cannot use sizeof here? –  ouah Nov 2 '12 at 21:14

1 Answer 1

Shouldn't this do the trick?

struct __attribute__((aligned(CACHE_LINE_SIZE))) t_struct_inner {
  int a;
  ... // more members.
};

Edit: Suppose your cache line is 128 bytes long and t_struct_inner's members have a total size of 259 bytes long. Due to the alignment of 128 bytes the following array:

t_struct_inner my_array[2];

is (3*128)*2 bytes long. the attribute(aligned) forces every element of the array to be aligned to an 128-byte boundary.

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The CACHE_LINE_SIZE is smaller than the t_struct_innter. I need it to align to multiple of the cache line size. –  sheki Nov 2 '12 at 16:55
    
@sheki Why? Is it not already cache aligned when you do it like in this answer? –  hvd Nov 2 '12 at 16:58
    
Suppose the cache line size is 128 bytes. and the t_inner_struct is of size 259bytes then it has to be aligned as aligned(3*128) –  sheki Nov 2 '12 at 16:59
    
@sheki Why does it need to be aligned at a multiple of the cache line size? What benefit does that provide? –  Mark B Nov 2 '12 at 17:09
    
If a thread is accessing a struct. It can just get stuff out of the cacheline. If a struct is shared b/w cachelines the Thread might have to wait as another thread is accessing the cacheline. –  sheki Nov 2 '12 at 17:10

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