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Suppose I have a method named foo which, for certain set of input values, is expected to complete successfully and return a result, and for some other set of values, is expected to throw a certain exception. This method requires some things to have set up before it can be tested.

Given these conditions, is it better to club success and failure tests in one test, or should I maintain these cases in separate test methods?

In other words, which of the following two approaches is preferable?

Approach 1:

@Test
public void testFoo() {
  setUpThings();
  // testing success case
  assertEquals(foo(s), y);
  // testing failure case
  try {
    foo(f);
    fail("Expected an exception.")
  } catch (FooException ex) {
  }
}

Approach 2:

@Test
public void testFooSuccess() {
  setUpThings();
  assertEquals(foo(s), y);
}

@Test
public void testFooFailure() {
  setUpThings();
  try {
    foo(f);
    fail("Expected an exception.")
  } catch (FooException ex) {
  }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Best you go for approach #2.

Why:

Well when an asserts fails the rest of the method is not evaluated... so by putting the tests in 2 separate methods you are sure to at least execute both tests.. failure or not.

Not only should a unit test focus on one specific unit, it should focus on one specific behaviour of that unit. Testing multiple behaviours at once only muddies the water. Take the time to separate each behaviour into its own unit test.

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I like approach #2. Separate tests are better.

I don't like how you did test 2. Here's what I'd do:

@Test(expected = FooException.class)
public void testFooFailure() {
  setUpThings();
  foo(f);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your view. About @Test(expected ..., I am aware of it, but for some reason my build tool (gradle) does not work correctly with it (i.e. the tests always fail), and so I am doing it err... manually. – missingfaktor Nov 2 '12 at 17:04

Approach 3 (extension of 2)

@Before
public void setUpThings() {
  ...
}

@Test
public void testFooSuccess() {
  assertEquals(foo(s), y);
}

@Test(expected=FooException.class)
public void testFooFailure() {
  foo(f);
}

I's good to have focused tests that exercise just one condition at a time, so that a failed test can only mean one thing (Approach 2). And if they all use the same setup, you can move that to a common setup method (@Before). If not, maybe it's better to think about separating related cases into different classes, so that you have not only more focused cases (methods) but also more focused fixtures (classes).

share|improve this answer
    
I don't need to call setUpThings before all tests. :) – missingfaktor Nov 2 '12 at 17:13
    
Do you need all your tests in the same class? Maybe it's good to separate the ones that have different characteristics (like setup methods) in different classes. – Jordão Nov 2 '12 at 17:14
    
One class per method does not sound good. Is it a common practice? – missingfaktor Nov 2 '12 at 17:17
    
It depends. I see at least three in this class. – Jordão Nov 2 '12 at 17:18

For me Approach 2 is preferable. Because you first test happy path and then fail condition . if some one need to test happy scenarios only you will have it.

share|improve this answer

Separate test cases as better for two reasons:

  1. You test case should be atomic
  2. If first assert condition fails, it will not evaluate the second one.
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