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The following code:

class Base{}

class Agg extends Base{

   public String getFields(){
    String name="Agg";
    return name;
   }
}

public class Avf{
   public static void main(String args[]){
   Base a=new Agg();
   //please take a look here
   System.out.println(((Agg)a).getFields());  // why a needs cast to Agg? 

  }
}

My question is: why we can't replace ((Agg)a).getFields() to a.getFields()? Why we need to type cast on a? And I mention that getFields() is not defined in class Base, thus class Agg does not extend this method from its base class. But if I defined method getFields() in class Base, like:

class Base{
    public String getFields(){
        String name="This is from base getFields()";
        return name;
    }
}

everything would be all right. Then ((Agg)a).getFields() is equivalent to a.getFields()

In the code

Base a=new Agg();    

Does this line means a has the reference of Agg() and a can invoke directly the method of class Agg. But why is there difference if I do not define the method getFields() in class Base? Can any one explain this to me?

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So, what is the question again? –  OscarRyz Nov 2 '12 at 17:17
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5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

System.out.println(((Agg)a).getFields()); // why a needs cast to Agg?

Because Base doesn't have a method called getFields.

The declaration

Base a;

...tells the compiler the interface you're going to use when using a. It doesn't matter that you then assign new Agg(); to it, the interface you have to a is still Base. And since Base doesn't have getFields, trying to use getFields is a compilation error.

Base a=new Agg();

Does this line means a has the reference of Agg() and a can invoke directly the method of class Agg.

It means a contains a reference to an Agg object, but the interface to that object is defined by Base, not Agg, and so you can't call Agg methods on it if they're not defined by Base (without a cast, and casts are dangerous and should be avoided where possible).

If your code needs access to methods or fields defined by Agg, then the variable (or argument, in my example) should be declared Agg a, not Base a.

This is a fundamental thing about OOP in general and the OOP implementation in Java in particular: There's a big difference between the interface to an object and the implementation of the object. In your example, you know Base a is really an Agg, but consider this:

void foo(Base a) {
    // Use `a` here...
}

// A long time later in a class far, far away...
xyz.foo(new Agg());

Clearly here the compiler shouldn't allow you to use methods or fields on a that aren't defined by Base. It's the same situation in your code, just less obvious.

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My question is: why we can't replace ((Agg)a).getFields() to a.getFields()? why we need to type cast on a?

It sounds like you understand this really - the compiler wouldn't find a getFields method on the compile-time type of a (which is Base), therefore it would raise a compile-time error.

It seems like this is the real guts of the question:

 Base a=new Agg();

Does this line means a has the reference of Agg() and a can invoke directly the method of class Agg. But why is there difference if i do not define the method getFields() in class Base? Can any one explain to me?

It means that the compiler will only allow you to access members of Base, as that's all it knows to be available. If there are multiple methods with the same name, overload resolution is also applied to the compile-time type.

However, at execution time, you're actually calling the methods on an object of type Agg - so if Agg overrides a method declared in Base, that implementation in Agg will be used.

Basically, you need to differentiate between decisions which are made at compile time based on the compile-time type of an expression, vs decisions which are made (by the JVM) at execution time based on the execution-time type of an object that a value refers to.

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The line Base a=new Agg(); means
1 - local variable a belongs to type Base
2 - there is a new object of type Agg
3 - variable a references that object
The object and the variable have different (but compatible) types. Since the variable a has the type Base, there is no a.getFields()
But since the variable references an object of class Agg, you can cast it to Agg and access getFields
A variable is (somehow like approximate sort of) a pointer to an object, and not an object.

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Because type Agg is a more concrete type of Base. Type of a in your declaration is Base. What is in left side of declaration represents the type of an object. Actually a contains method getFields(), but because it is upcasted, the method is hidden in the type Base. I recommend you HeadFirstJava book. It helps you to clear out these concepts.

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An instance of a Class has access to its methods (defined in the class definition) and methods of its superclass (ex. Object class). Therefore instance of Class Base with reference variable "a", can not access method getFields(). It's neither defined in its class structure or its super class. When you typecast like below:

((Agg)a)

You are basically changing changing the type from (Base) to type (Agg). Agg which is a subclass of Base, defines method getFields().

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