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I am trying to use the following algorithm to convert a decimal number to a binary number in C. I don't understand why it doesn't work properly for some inputs (e.g. for 1993 I get 1420076519).

int aux=x;
long bin=0;
while (aux>0)
{
    bin=bin*10+aux%2;
    aux=aux/2;
}
printf("%d in decimal is %ld in binary.", x, bin);
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Integer overflow? long (if 64 bits) can only accomodate 10 digits. –  Jan Dvorak Nov 2 '12 at 18:31
3  
I'd suggest using strings and concatenating your "0" and "1" characters. Depending on the size of your integers, you're going to overflow at fairly small values. –  Bob Kaufman Nov 2 '12 at 18:31
    
It is not a good idea to store binary in long int. Instead you can use strings. Following code should work for you. –  CCoder Nov 2 '12 at 18:33
1  
You should really clear up your thinking. There is no such thing as a "decimal number" or a "binary number". The place-value system is just a way to represent numbers. Ask yourself: is the number of fingers on your hand a binary or a decimal? You can only program right if you're thinking straight. –  Kerrek SB Nov 2 '12 at 18:38
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5 Answers

You should be using strings to store binary number. Following code should work for you.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *decimal_to_binary(int);

main()
{
   int n, c, k;
   char *pointer;

   printf("Enter an integer in decimal number system\n");
   scanf("%d",&n);

   pointer = decimal_to_binary(n);
   printf("Binary string of %d is: %s\n", n, pointer);

   free(pointer);

   return 0;
}

char *decimal_to_binary(int n)
{
   int c, d, count;
   char *pointer;

   count = 0;
   pointer = (char*)malloc(32+1);

   if ( pointer == NULL )
      exit(EXIT_FAILURE);

   for ( c = 31 ; c >= 0 ; c-- )
   {
      d = n >> c;

      if ( d & 1 )
         *(pointer+count) = 1 + '0';
      else
         *(pointer+count) = 0 + '0';

      count++;
   }
   *(pointer+count) = '\0';

   return  pointer;
}
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What is t in the second printf statement of main()? –  Question_Guy Mar 11 at 3:56
    
@Question_Guy a typo! –  CCoder Apr 25 at 7:14
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If you know the algorithm there's no reason not to use itoa

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/itoa/

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main ()
{
  int n;
  char output[100];

  printf("Enter a number: ");
  scanf("%d", &n);

  itoa(n, output, 2); //2 means base two, you can put any other number here

  printf("The number %d is %s in binary.", n, output);

  return 0;
}
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How does the conversion works?

/* Example: 
   125(10) -----> ?(2)                     125  |_2
                                            -1-   62  |_2
                                                  -0-   31 |_2
                                                        -1-  15 |_2
                                                             -1-  7 |_2
                                                                 -1-  3 |_2
                                                                     -1-  1 */

So in this example the binary number for 125(10) is 1111101(2), and this is the process I describe in my function.

/* Functions declaration (Prototype) */

 int wordCalculator( int * const word, long int number, int base );
    int main( void )
        {
            int i, base;
            int word[ 32 ];
            unsigned long int number;

            printf( "Enter the decimal number to be converted: " );
            scanf( "%ld", &number );
            printf( "\nEnter the new base: " );
            scanf( "%d", &base );

            i = wordCalculator( word, number, base );

            printf( "The number is: " );

            for(; i >= 0; i--){

                if ( word[ i ] <= 9)
                    printf( "%d", word[ i ] );

                else
                    /* 65 represents A in ASCII code. */
                    printf( "%c", ( 65 - 10 + word[ i ] ) );
            }

            printf( "\n" );
        }

        int wordCalculator( int * const word, long int number, int base )
        {
            unsigned long int result = number;
            int i, difference;

            i = 0;
            do{
                difference = result % base;
                result /= base;
                *( word + i ) = difference;
                i++;

                if ( result < base )
                    *( word + i ) = result;

            } while( result >= base );

            return i;

        }
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I think the shortest answer is

char* getBinary(int n,char *s)
{
  while(n>0)
  {
    *s=(n&1)+'0';
    s++;
    n>>=1;
  }
  *s='\0';
  return s;
}

In the called function print it in reverse way .. because storing is done LSB to MSB But we have to print MSB first then LSB

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When you print a long you dont print the binary. The best way to convert to binary or show the binary representation of a decimal number is by storing it in a string. Bellow is a solution offered in a another SO answer

void getBin(int num, char *str)
{
  *(str+5) = '\0';
  int mask = 0x10 << 1;
  while(mask >>= 1)
    *str++ = !!(mask & num) + '0';
}

Update: If more then 5 digits, check out this fiddle

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ANNDDD here is the fiddle for the lazy: cfiddle.net/NGPwfm –  srijan Nov 2 '12 at 18:37
    
The problem is I am not familiar with pointers in C yet, that's why I was trying to find a more beginner-friendly solution. –  Tudor Ciotlos Nov 2 '12 at 18:42
    
You should probably try to get familiar with pointers soon. They make up the core of C –  Florin Stingaciu Nov 2 '12 at 18:43
    
@FlorinStingaciu: Will that work if number is having more than actual 5 bits.. I didn't get it plz explain –  Omkant Nov 2 '12 at 18:46
    
@Omkant Here's the fiddle for more then 5 digits. –  Florin Stingaciu Nov 2 '12 at 18:50
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