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So here is a more java-esq approach (I think)...I have this code in Ruby

class Human
  def move
    p 'Human move: X'
  end
end


class Computer
  def move
    p'Computer move: O'
  end
end

class Player
  def initialize(letter)
    if letter == 'X'
      return Human.new
    else
      return Computer.new
    end
  end
end

bob = Player.new('X')
bob.move

I'm expecting to get back on cli 'Human move: X' I'm getting an error of the following...

undefined method `move' for #<Player:0x007f8d930895a8> (NoMethodError)

Can anybody help this Ruby noob?

-------------------------discussion------------------------

Now I've just figured a way of doing this in a more, I guess, 'classic' Ruby fashion using inheritance and overriding. Now, this just makes no sense to the sub processors in my mind.I mean, if I do it this way...I could have just required the class files in any other class file and instantiated a new object their. It does not feel truly polymorphic the way it does when you do it in Java....here's the code....

class Player
  def move
    return ""
  end
end

class Human < Player
  def move
    return 'Human move: X'
  end
end


class Computer < Player
  def move
    return'Computer move: O'
  end
end



players = [Human.new, Computer.new]
players.each {|player|
  print player.move
}
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You almost made it :) In ruby you can't return an arbitrary object from a constructor. Well, you can, but that return value is ignored. Instead use a Factory Method (in OOP speak).

class Human
  def move
    p 'Human move: X'
  end
end


class Computer
  def move
    p 'Computer move: O'
  end
end

class Player
  def self.get_player(letter)
    if letter == 'X'
      return Human.new
    else
      return Computer.new
    end
  end
end

bob = Player.get_player('X')
bob.move
# >> "Human move: X"
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Can't he just override Player.new? I believe I did that once, but I'd have to go back and find it. –  phoffer Nov 2 '12 at 18:51
1  
@phoffer: Yeah, I think he can, but he shouldn't. –  Sergio Tulentsev Nov 2 '12 at 18:51
    
Ya it is possible, I just did it on my own. Same as yours, but changing self.get_player to self.new and then the 2nd to last line. Would you mind explaining why that is bad practice? –  phoffer Nov 2 '12 at 18:53
1  
@phoffer: Because it screws things up badly. When I call Player.new I expect to get a Player, not a totally unrelated Human. Isn't that obvious? –  Sergio Tulentsev Nov 2 '12 at 18:56
    
Yes that is fairly obvious for this situation :) I used it for a different pattern that either returned a new instance, or updated and already existing one. I misread your original comment as meaning it's bad in general, as oppose to this instance. I think this example would be better to subclass human and computer from player. –  phoffer Nov 2 '12 at 18:59
show 3 more comments

You're calling Player.new, so you'll get a Player object back, no matter what you return in the initialize function. If for some reason you don't want to instantiate Human and Computer directly, do something like that :

class Player
  def self.new_player(letter)
    if letter == 'X'
      return Human.new
    else
      return Computer.new
    end
  end
end

bob = Player.new_player('X')
bob.move #Prints your output
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