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I have an interface and 2 classes inheriting that interface like below

public interface ILeader
{
    int ID { set; get; }
    string Name { set; get; }
}
public class User : ILeader
{
    public int ID { set; get; }
    public string Name { set; get; }
}
public class Group : ILeader
{
    public int ID { set; get; }
    public string Name { set; get; }
}

Now i have 2 method which has a parameter of type ILeader and IList of ILeader

public void Change(ILeader leader)
{
  //do some thing           
}
public void ChangeList(IList<ILeader> leaderList)
{
  //do some thing           
}

now i can pass an object of either Group or User to Change method and it works. But when i try to do the same with a List to ChangeList method it gives me compile time error.

IList<User> userList=new List<User>();
userList.Add(new User { ID=1, Name ="Happy"});

Change(userList[0]);  //this works

ChangeList(userList);  //this throws compile error

The error is

cannot convert from List<User> to List<ILeader>

How to make my ChangeList method work so that i can pass both a list of Users and Groups ?

share|improve this question
    
You may not be able to, depending on what you're wanting to do with ChangeList. What does ChangeList do? –  D Stanley Nov 2 '12 at 18:52
    
@DStanley: Do some filteration on the list items and reset the Name property for few items in the list –  Happy Nov 2 '12 at 18:55
    

4 Answers 4

If you are using .Net 4.0 or greater, you can change your IList(T) to an IEnumerable(T) and it will work. The IList(T) interface's T parameter is not covariant and IEnumerable(T) interface's T parameter is. See

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd469487.aspx

for further explanation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Incase if i want to return the updated list from my method, should i user IEnumerable<ILeader> as return type and cast it back to List<User> or List<Group> wherever i call this method ? –  Happy Nov 2 '12 at 19:10
    
@Happy, IEnumerable<T> is readonly, so you cannot add/remove items using this method. However, you can modify the items themselves (e.g. change their Name properties). Consequently, you do not need to return a "resulting list", because the original list is unchanged. –  Eren Ersönmez Nov 2 '12 at 19:24

You should actually rely on generic type constraint on your second method:

public void ChangeList<T>(IList<T> leaderList) where T : ILeader
{
  //do some thing           
}

Now you can pass both the lists.

share|improve this answer

In C#, classes are not covarient, which is the feature you're trying to use here. See this FAQ for more information on that.

A couple of important rules to remember:

This feature works only for generic interfaces and delegates. If you implement a variant generic interface, the implementing class is still invariant. Classes and structs do not support variance in C# 4.0. So the following doesn’t compile:

// List<T> implements the covariant interface
// IEnumerable<out T>. But classes are invariant.
List<Person> list = new List<Employee>(); // Compiler error here.

In order to make this work, you need to cast your User to an ILeader. You'd do this with userList.Cast<ILeader>().

share|improve this answer

Because IList<T> is not covariant, which means there's nothing from stopping ChangeList from adding a Group to the list of Users, which is obviously invalid.

To pass a list of both kinds, convert the list to a List<ILeader>:

ChangeList(userList.Cast<ILeader>().ToList()); 

However be aware that this doesn't actually cast the list, it creates a new list where each member is an instance of ILeader. Which means that ChangeList could add a Group to the list, meaning you couldn't convert it back to a List<User>.

If ChangeList doesn't add any members to the list you can just convert it back:

var leaderList = userList.Cast<ILeader>().ToList();
ChangeList(leaderList);  
userList = leaderList.Cast<User>().ToList();

If ChangeList adds any items other than Users then the conversion will fail. Your best choice is to take only the Users from the result:

var leaderList = userList.Cast<ILeader>().ToList();
ChangeList(leaderList);  
userList = leaderList.OfType<User>().ToList();  // will ignore anything that's not a `User`
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thanks. i want my changelist method to make changes to the Name property values of some users in the list and return it back. what should be my return type. –  Happy Nov 2 '12 at 19:17
    
Technically you don't need one since the List is just a reference to the underlying objects, however it would be better to return an IList<ILeader> and leave the passed-in list alone. Most "change" methods don't change in the passed-in reference but return a new instance instead. –  D Stanley Nov 2 '12 at 19:20
    
OK. So when calling the method, i should cast it with as List<User>; ? –  Happy Nov 2 '12 at 19:22
    
No, you can't cast it to a List<User> - you have to convert it using the method above –  D Stanley Nov 2 '12 at 19:23

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