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I was looking at the implemention of

Observable.FromEvent<TEventHandler, TEventHandlerArgs>(add, remove)

and I'm struggling to grasp how it works. Lets says that TEventHandler is the standard:

public delegate void EventHandler(object sender, EventArgs e);

then the code that is puzzling me is:

TEventHandler d = (TEventHandler) Delegate.CreateDelegate(
    typeof (TEventHandler),
    (object) new Action<EventArgs>(observer.OnNext),
    typeof (Action<EventArgs>).GetMethod("Invoke"));

(n.b I've specialised this generic code to this specific example instance.)

How is it that CreateDelegate is creating a delegate of signature (obj, args) that is bound to an invoke method of signature (args) on the action? Where is obj going?

It feels a bit like it might be around having an open delegate on action and we are coercing the 'this' to be 'firstArguemnt' from CreateDelegate and allowing the args to fall through. If so feels kinda dirty?

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2  
Are you sure you have the right code? Trying a simple example that mirrors the above call gives me: Cannot bind to the target method because its signature or security transparency is not compatible with that of the delegate type. –  casperOne Nov 2 '12 at 19:36
    
Possibly not, I'm using the resharper recompiler which has struggled with rx before. Will do some testing. Thanks for looking. –  DanH Nov 2 '12 at 20:14
1  
Here's the gist of the sample that I used to get the error that recreates the above: gist.github.com/4004086 –  casperOne Nov 2 '12 at 20:20
1  
I'm going to close this as "too localized" for now, as it doesn't seem that what you posted is actually what is in the framework; that said, if you have more research that makes it not too localized, flag the question and we'll unlock it (assuming that not still too localized). –  casperOne Nov 2 '12 at 20:52
5  
In case anyone is curious, I was using the wrong method in rx. Should have been Observable.FromEventPattern, the implementation of which then makes perfect sense as the signatures match. FromEvent is for events that do not conform to standard pattern of (obj, args)! –  DanH Nov 2 '12 at 23:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Let's break it down:

Firstly, decompiling Rx v2.0.3 doesn't seem to have a Observable.FromEvent<TEventHandler, TEventHandlerArgs>(add, remove) method, and neither does Rx v 1.1 which I happened to have lying around. I'm going to assume you mean the nearest match I can find, which is this:

public static IObservable<TEventArgs> FromEvent<TDelegate, TEventArgs>(Action<TDelegate> addHandler, Action<TDelegate> removeHandler)

Looking at the decompiled source for Rx 1.1 (the 2.0 source has gone all architecture astronaut on us and is full of indirection which makes it much harder to follow) The actual code snippet using reflector to decompile is this:

Action<TEventArgs> o = new Action<TEventArgs>(observer.OnNext);
    TDelegate d = CreateDelegate<TDelegate>(o,
        typeof(Action<TEventArgs>).GetMethod("Invoke"));

    addHandler(d);

So, the question:

How is it that CreateDelegate is creating a delegate of signature (obj, args) that is bound to an invoke method of signature (args) on the action? Where is obj going?

I'm not sure if I've understood quite correctly, but it seems like the question specifically is something like How does CreateDelegate<TDelegate>(o, typeof(Action<TEventArgs>).GetMethod("Invoke") produce a method with only the args parameter - what happens to the o object?

What's happening is that yes, the o object is being passed as object firstArgument to the internal .NET framework method.

public static Delegate CreateDelegate(Type type, object firstArgument, MethodInfo method, bool throwOnBindFailure)

This method "binds" the firstArgument as basically being the this pointer for the returned method. Internally it will store a reference to the firstArgument somewhere inside the delegate object. We can't see inside that as it's an internal .NET implementation detail and so it can do all sorts of odd things and break rules where it pleases.

It feels a bit like it might be around having an open delegate on action and we are coercing the 'this' to be 'firstArguemnt' from CreateDelegate and allowing the args to fall through. If so feels kinda dirty?

Yes, that's pretty much exactly what's happening. This is what that CreateDelegate function is designed to do.
Except it gets even dirtier than that. CreateDelegate simply returns an object of type Delegate - we have no type safety on the method args, etc - and then the code casts it into a TDelegate - this works because delegate is special and you can cast it to any function type that has the same "shape". As above, it's an internal .NET implementation detail and so it can do all sorts of weird things :-)

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I actually realised my question was based on a misunderstanding of the syntax and thus incorrect usage (if you read the original comments it is mentioned). I guess I should have added an answer explicitly saying that to close the question. Thanks for your efforts though. I'll mark you as the answer as compensation ;) –  DanH Nov 28 '13 at 14:58

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