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I need a help with this code. When I run it in the terminal, I get:

<__main__.Polynomial instance at 0x2b6ae51c80e0>
<__main__.Polynomial instance at 0x2b6ae51c84d0>
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "Polynomial_dict1.py", line 36, in <module>
    print p+p2
  File "Polynomial_dict1.py", line 22, in __add__
    result_d[key] = other.d[:]
TypeError: unhashable type

I do not know what is wrong. Here is the code:

from Polynomial import*
class Polynomial:
    def __init__(self, dictionary):
        self.d = dictionary


    def __call__(self, x):
        s = 0

        for key in d.keys:
            s += self.d[key]*x**key
        return s

    def __add__(self, other):
        if len(self.d)>len(other.d):
            result_d = self.d[:]        # copy
            for key in d.keys:
                result_d[key] += other.get(key,0)
        else:
            result_d = other.d[:]
            for key in d.keys:
                result_d[key] += self.d.get[key,0]
        return Polynomial(result_d)     


p = Polynomial({1:1,100:-3})
p2 = Polynomial({1:-1,20:1,100:4})

print p 
print p2
print p+p2
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closed as not a real question by interjay, Lie Ryan, Ben, bmargulies, the Tin Man Nov 4 '12 at 19:55

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
that's a serious flaw. What if the keys are co-inciding? for example how will you represent 1+3i and 1-3i? –  Aniket Nov 2 '12 at 19:09
1  
The line shown in the traceback above does not exist in your code. Also, you didn't post the exception itself. –  interjay Nov 2 '12 at 19:12
1  
I changed your tabs to spaces for the benefit of SO's renderer. Please check to make sure I got the formatting correct and everything. –  mgilson Nov 2 '12 at 19:13
    
@abarnert -- The indentation error is probably my fault. I tried to format everything as code, but it was originally indented with tabs. When converting to spaces for SO's renderer, I might have shifted some things. :-X. Comparing with the original, I think it's OK now (at least as far as indentation is concerned) –  mgilson Nov 2 '12 at 19:22
    
This can't possibly be your code. Even after fixing the indent errors, the line result_d[key] = other.d[:] does not appear anywhere in your posted code. There is a result_d = other.d[:], which does throw an exception (the one mgilson explains in his answer), but there's no way anyone can be sure that's the exception you ran into, since you gave us the wrong code, and didn't tell us what the exception was. –  abarnert Nov 2 '12 at 19:23
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3 Answers 3

As far as I can tell, you're trying to use slice syntax on a dictionary (self.d[:]). That doesn't work. To make a copy, you want self.d.copy().


You'll also get an error on this line:

result_d[key] += self.d.get[key,0]

It should be:

result_d[key] += self.d.get(key,0)

Also,

for key in d.keys:

doesn't work since keys is a method -- you need to call it:

for key in self.d.keys():
share|improve this answer
    
you mean self.d.copy()? –  Gullmira Nov 2 '12 at 19:17
    
@Gullmira -- Yes, that's what I meant. sorry. –  mgilson Nov 2 '12 at 19:17
    
for key in d.keys(): NameError: global name 'd' is not defined –  Gullmira Nov 2 '12 at 19:22
    
@Gullmira -- Of course. I assume you want self.d.keys(). I was only pointing out that you needed to call dict.keys() in order to actually get something you can iterate over. –  mgilson Nov 2 '12 at 19:25
    
Iget for key in d.keys(): NameError: global name 'd' is not defined –  Gullmira Nov 2 '12 at 19:26
show 3 more comments

I assume what he is trying to is the following:

He wants to create a program that can add polynomials. Where the polynomials coefficients and powers are implemented into the program as a dictionary.

p = Polynomial({1:1, 100:-3})
p2= Polynomial({1:-1, 20:1, 100:4})

Where the key is the power and the value is the coefficient of that power.

p and p2 on mathematical form is:

x - 3x*100 {1:1, 100:-3} and x*20 - x + 4x**100 {1:-1, 20:1, 100:4}

and the print statements should yield the following: x*20+x*100

I'm curious as to how you would call the add method though, or is that automatically done when you add the 2 instances?

Because the above mentioned print statements gives this when run:

Terminal > python stack_overflow.py 
    <__main__.Polynomial instance at 0x7f6879fffd88>
    <__main__.Polynomial instance at 0x7f6879fffe18>
    <__main__.Polynomial instance at 0x7f6879fffe60>
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This a version of your code that gets rid of all the syntax problems and makes your code run without error, although I don't really know if it's want you were trying to do.

from Polynomial import*
class Polynomial:
    def __init__(self, dictionary):
        self.d = dictionary

    def __call__(self, x):
        s = 0
        for key in d.keys():
            s += self.d[key] * x**key
        return s

    def __add__(self, other):
        if len(self.d)>len(other.d):
            result_d = self.copy()
            for key in self.d:
                result_d[key] += other.get(key, 0)
        else:
            result_d = other.d.copy()
            for key in other.d:
                result_d[key] += self.d.get(key, 0)

        return Polynomial(result_d)

p = Polynomial({1:1, 100:-3})
p2 = Polynomial({1:-1, 20:1, 100:4})

print p
print p2
print p+p2

Here's a list of everything which was fixed / changed:

result_d = self.d[:] --> result_d = self.d.copy()
result_d = other.d[:] --> result_d = other.d.copy()

In other places I changed statements like for key in d.keys: to for key in d:
(although for key in d,keys(): would have also worked).

In one line you had result_d[key] += self.d.get[key,0]
instead of result_d[key] += self.d.get(key,0)

I left it in, but the from Polynomial import* at the beginning is probably a mistake, too, because it causes the script to import itself and basically run twice.

You really should try to get the syntax errors out of your code before posting question here (unless you can't and that's your question).

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